Etymology
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toxemia (n.)

"blood-poisoning," also toxaemia, 1848, from toxo- (before vowels tox-, from Greek toxon; see toxic) + -emia (from Greek haima "blood").

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Tartarus (n.)

in Homer and older Greek mythology, the sunless abyss below Hades, from Greek Tartaros, of uncertain origin; "prob. a word of imitative origin, suggestive of something frightful" [Klein]. Later in Greek almost synonymous with Hades.

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hexapod (n.)

"six-footed insect," 1660s, from Modern Latin hexapod-, stem of hexapodus, from Greek hex "six" (see six) + Greek pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Greek hexapous (adj.) was used only with reference to poetic meter. As an adjective from 1856.

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melanoma (n.)

"tumor containing melanin," 1826, medical Latin, from Greek melas (genitive melanos) "black" (see melano-) + -oma. Greek melanōma meant "blackness."

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chiastic (adj.)

"of the nature of a chiasmus," 1856, from Latinized form of Greek khiastos "arranged diagonally; marked with an X" (i.e., resembling the Greek letter chi) + -ic.

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Poseidon (n.)

Greek god of the sea and earthquakes, one of the chief Olympians, a brother of Zeus, Greek Poseidon (Doric Poteidan), a name of uncertain origin. Related: Poseidonian.

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greeking (n.)

in typography or composition, "text rendered in random characters or symbols" (not necessarily Greek; lorem ipsum is a form of it), also the rendition of text into such characters, by 1977, said to be from the sense in expression Greek to me "unintelligible" (see Greek (adj.)).

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sternocleidomastoid (adj.)

medical Latin, from sterno- "sternum," Greek sternon "breast, breastbone," or Latin sternum (see sternum) + Latinized Greek kleis (see clavicle) + mastoid.

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Lapith 

ancient people of Thessaly, c. 1600, Greek Lapithoi; they were celebrated for their battle with the centaurs, a favorite theme of Greek art.

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conger (n.)

"large, voracious species of salt-water eel," c. 1300, from Latin conger "sea-eel," from Greek gongros "conger," which is often considered to be Pre-Greek.

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