Etymology
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Italiot (adj.)

also Italiote, of or belonging to the ancient Greek settlements in southern Italy," 1650s, from Greek Italiotes, from Italia (see Italy).

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omicron (n.)

15th letter of the Greek alphabet, c. 1400, literally "small 'o,' " from o + Greek (s)mikros "small" (see micro-). So called because the vowel was "short" in ancient Greek. Compare omega.

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Alcyone 

brightest of the Pleiades (Eta Tauri), in Greek myth a daughter of Aeolus; Latinized form of Greek Aklyone, from alkyon "kingfisher," a word of unknown origin.

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toxemia (n.)

"blood-poisoning," also toxaemia, 1848, from toxo- (before vowels tox-, from Greek toxon; see toxic) + -emia (from Greek haima "blood").

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Apollonian (adj.)

1660s, "of, pertaining to, or resembling the Greek god Apollo," from Apollo (Greek Apollon) + -ian. The Greek adjective was Apollonios. Other adjectival forms in English include Apollinarian, Apollonic, Apolline (c. 1600). Also sometimes in reference to Apollonius of Perga, the great geometer.

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thalasso- 

before vowels thalass-, word-forming element meaning "sea, the sea," from Greek thalassa "the sea" (in Homer, when used of a particular sea, "the Mediterranean," as opposed to ōkeanos), a word from the Pre-Greek substrate language. In Attic Greek thalatta, hence sometimes thalatto-.

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Pindaric (adj.)

1630s, pertaining to or in the (reputed) style of Pindar, from Latin Pindaricus, from Greek Pindaros, the Greek lyric poet (c. 522-443 B.C.E.).

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Samos 

Greek island in the Aegean, from Old Greek samos "a height, dune, seaside hill." Many references to it are as the birthplace of Pythagoras.

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koine (n.)

common literary dialect of Greek in the Roman and early medieval period, 1903, from feminine singular of Greek koinos "common, ordinary" (see coeno-). Used earlier as a Greek word in English. From 1926 of other dialects in similar general use.

[Isocrates] helped to lay the foundations for that invaluable vehicle of civilization, the Koinê Dialektos, through which, at the price of becoming easy, flat, common, and a little soulless, the Greek language in the Hellenistic period evangelized the whole Mediterranean world. [Gilbert Murray, "Greek Studies," 1946]
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Tartarus (n.)

in Homer and older Greek mythology, the sunless abyss below Hades, from Greek Tartaros, of uncertain origin; "prob. a word of imitative origin, suggestive of something frightful" [Klein]. Later in Greek almost synonymous with Hades.

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