Etymology
Advertisement
Ezekiel 

masc. proper name; in Old Testament, name of a book and of one of the great prophets of Israel, from Late Latin Ezechiel, from Greek Iezekiel, from Hebrew Yehezqel, literally "God strengthens," from hazaq "he was strong, he strengthened" + El "God."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Darius 

name of three Persian rulers, notably Darius the Great, Persian emperor 521-485 B.C.E., from Greek Darius, from Old Persian Darayavaus, probably literally "he who holds firm the good," from PIE root *dher- "to hold firmly, support."

Related entries & more 
Armageddon (n.)

"cataclysmic final conflict," 1811, figurative use of the place-name in Revelation xvi.16, the site of the great and final conflict, from Hebrew Har Megiddon "Mount of Megiddo," a city in central Palestine, site of important Israelite battles.

Related entries & more 
Massachusetts 

U.S. state; the word is plural, originally (1614) a name for the Algonquian native people who lived around the bay, from Algonquian Massachusett "at the large hill," in reference to Great Blue Hill, southwest of Boston. Related: Massachusettensian.

Related entries & more 
Utah 

U.S. teritory organized 1850 (admitted as a state 1896), from Spanish yuta, name of the indigenous Uto-Aztecan people of the Great Basin (Modern English Ute), perhaps from Western Apache (Athabaskan) yudah "high" (in reference to living in the mountains).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
May 

fifth month of the modern calendar, early 12c., Mai, from Old French mai and directly from Latin Majus, Maius mensis "month of May," possibly from Maja, Maia, a Roman earth goddess (wife of Vulcan) whose name is of unknown origin; possibly from PIE *mag-ya "she who is great," fem. suffixed form of root *meg- "great" (cognate with Latin magnus).

"[R]eckoned on the continent of Europe and in America as the last month of spring, but in Great Britain as the first of summer" [Century Dictionary, 1897]. Replaced Old English þrimilce, month in which cows can be milked three times a day. May marriages have been considered unlucky at least since Ovid's day. May-apple, perennial herb native to North America, so called for its time of blooming and its yellowish fruit, is attested from 1733, American English.

Related entries & more 
Herodian (adj.)

pertaining to Herod, name of rulers in ancient Palestine in Roman times, especially Herod the Great, king of Judea 38-4 B.C.E. The name is Greek, Hērōdes, from hērōs "hero" (see hero (n.1)) + patronymic suffix -des.

Related entries & more 
Shoshone 

1805, noun and adjective (Lewis and Clark), in reference to Uto-Aztecan people of the Great Basin and their language, a name of unknown origin. It first was applied to eastern Shoshones of Wyoming according to Bright, who uses the spelling Shoshoni. Related: Shoshonean.

Related entries & more 
Victoria 

fem. proper name, Latin, literally "victory in war," also the name of the Roman goddess of victory (see victory). The Victoria cross is a decoration founded 1856 by Queen Victoria of Great Britain and awarded for acts of conspicuous bravery in battle.

Related entries & more 
Pythia (n.)

"priestess of Apollo at Delphi," who received his oracles in the inner sanctuary of the great temple, 1842, from Greek pythia (hiereia) "(Priestess) of Pythian Apollo," from a variant form of Pythios, an epithet of Apollo, from Pytho, older name of the region of Delphi (see python).

Related entries & more 

Page 3