Etymology
Advertisement
D.A.R. 

initialism for Daughters of the American Revolution, a non-profit patriotic service organization founded in 1890 for women directly descended from someone involved in the war of independence by the American colonies of Great Britain.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
historiaster (n.)
"petty or contemptible historian," 1887, from historian with ending altered to -aster. Coined by W.E. Gladstone, in a review of J. Dunbar Ingram's "History of the Legislative Union of Great Britain and Ireland."
Related entries & more 
red tape (n.)

"official routine or formula," especially "excessive bureaucratic rigmarole," 1736, in reference to the red tape formerly used in Great Britain (and the American colonies) for binding up legal and other official documents, which is mentioned from 1690s.

Related entries & more 
Victorian (adj.)
1839, "belonging to or typical of the reign of Queen Victoria of Great Britain" (ruled 1837-1901). Figurative sense of "typified by prudish or outdated attitudes" is attested by 1934. The noun meaning "a person from or typical of Victorian times" is from 1876.
Related entries & more 
Victoria 
fem. proper name, Latin, literally "victory in war," also the name of the Roman goddess of victory (see victory). The Victoria cross is a decoration founded 1856 by Queen Victoria of Great Britain and awarded for acts of conspicuous bravery in battle.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cornfield (n.)

also corn-field, "field where corn is grown," late 13c. as a surname, from corn (n.1) + field (n.). In Great Britain a field in which any kind of grain is growing; in U.S. restricted to a field of Indian corn.

Related entries & more 
quintillion (n.)
1670s, from Latin quintus "the fifth" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five") + ending from million. Compare billion. In Great Britain, the fifth power of a million (1 followed by 30 zeroes); in U.S. the sixth power of a thousand (1 followed by 18 zeroes).
Related entries & more 
Scot (n.)
Old English Scottas (plural) "inhabitants of Ireland, Irishmen," from Late Latin Scotti (c. 400), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Celtic (but answering to no known tribal name; Irish Scots appears to be a Latin borrowing). The name followed the Irish tribe which invaded Scotland 6c. C.E. after the Romans withdrew from Britain, and after the time of Alfred the Great the Old English word described only the Irish who had settled in the northwest of Britain.
Related entries & more 
tarmac (n.)
1903, Tarmac, a trademark name, short for tarmacadam (1882) "pavement created by spraying tar over crushed stone," from tar (n.1) + John L. McAdam (see macadam). By 1919, tarmac was being used generally in Great Britain for "runway."
Related entries & more 
trillion 
1680s, from French trillion, from Italian trilione; see tri- + million. In the U.S., the fourth power of a thousand (one thousand billion, 1 followed by 12 zeroes); in Great Britain, the third power of a million (one million billion, 1 followed by 18 zeroes), which is the original sense. Compare billion.
Related entries & more 

Page 3