Etymology
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garner (v.)
late 15c., "to store grain," from garner (n.). Related: Garnered; garnering.
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filigree (n.)
1690s, shortening of filigreen (1660s), from French filigrane "filigree" (17c.), from Italian filigrana, from Latin filum "thread, wire" (from PIE root *gwhi- "thread, tendon") + granum "grain" (from PIE root *gre-no- "grain"). Related: Filigreed.
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granite (n.)
1640s, from French granit(e) (17c.) or directly from Italian granito "granite," originally "grained," past-participle adjective from granire "granulate, make grainy," from grano "grain," from Latin granum "grain" (from PIE root *gre-no- "grain"). In reference to the appearance of the rock. Used figuratively for "hardness" (of the heart, head, etc.) from 1839. New Hampshire, U.S., has been the Granite State at least since 1825.
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shock (v.2)
"arrange (grain) in a shock," mid-15c., from shock (n.2). Related: Shocked; shocking.
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chondro- 

word-forming element in scientific compounds meaning "cartilage," from Latinized form of Greek khondros "cartilage" (of the breastbone), also "grain, grain of salt, seed, barley-grain," of uncertain origin. This is sometimes said to be from the PIE root meaning "to grind" which is the source of English grind (v.), but there are serious phonological objections and the word might be non-Indo-European [Beekes, "Etymological Dictionary of Greek"]. The body material so called for its gristly nature.

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ingrained (adj.)
"deeply rooted," 1590s, literally "dyed with grain "cochineal," the red dyestuff (see engrain). Figuratively, "thoroughly imbued" (of habits, principles, prejudices, etc.) from 1851. In reference to dyed carpets, etc., it is attested from 1766, from the manufacturing phrase in (the) grain "in the raw material before manufacture."
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mow (n.)

"stack of hay," Old English muga, muwa "a heap (of grain, pease, etc.), swath of corn; crowd of people," earlier muha, from Proto-Germanic *mugon (source also of Old Norse mugr "a heap," mostr "crowd"), of uncertain origin. Meaning "place in a barn where hay or sheaves of grain are stored" is by 1755.

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reaper (n.)

Middle English repere (early 14c. in surnames), "a harvester, one who cuts grain with a sickle or other instrument," replacing Old English ripere, agent noun from reap (v.). Sense of "a machine for cutting grain" is by 1841. As the name of a personification of death, by 1818.

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cornmeal (n.)

also corn-meal, "meal made of grain," 1782, from corn (n.1) + meal (n.2).

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coccus (n.)

1763 as an insect genus (including the cochineal bug and the kermes); 1883 as a type of bacterium; from Greek kokkos "grain, seed, berry" (see cocco-). Related: Coccoid.

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