Etymology
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priestess (n.)

"woman who officiates in sacred rites, a female minister of religion," 1690s, from priest + -ess. Earlier was priestress (mid-15c. prēsteresse).

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constitutionalism (n.)

1832, "the theory or principle of a constitutional system of government;" occasionally also "constitutionality, adherence to constitutional government;" from constitutional (adj.) + -ism. Related: Constitutionalist (1766).

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Seychelles 

renamed 1756 in honor of French finance minister Jean Moreau de Séchelles; the spelling was altered by the English when they took the islands from France in 1794. Related: Seychellois.

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misgovernment (n.)

late 14c., "want of self-restraint, misbehavior" (a sense now obsolete), from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + government. Meaning "bad government, management, or administration of public or private affairs" is from 1590s.

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oligarchic (adj.)

"pertaining to or of the nature of government by a few," 1640s, from Greek oligarkhikos "pertaining to oligarchy," from oligarkhos, related to oligarkhia "government by the few" (see oligarchy). Related: Oligarchical.

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mobocracy (n.)

"mob rule, government by the disorderly classes," 1754, a hybrid from mob (n.) + -cracy "rule or government by." Related: Mobocrat "leader of a mob, a demagogue" (1798); mobocratic.

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loyalism (n.)

"devotion to a government or cause," 1812, from loyal + -ism.

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hierocracy (n.)

"rule or government by priests," 1794, from hiero-, from Greek hieros "sacred, holy, divine" (see ire) + -cracy "rule or government by." Related: Hierocratic.

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portfolio (n.)

"movable receptacle for detached papers or prints," 1722, porto folio; 1719 as port folio, from Italian portafoglio "a case for carrying loose papers," from porta, imperative of portare "to carry" (from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over") + foglio "sheet, leaf," from Latin folium (see folio). Usually something like a book cover with a flexible back, fastened with strings or clasps. Meaning "official documents of a state department" is from 1835, hence figuratively, of a minister of state. A minister without portfolio is one not in charge of a particular department. Meaning "collection of securities held" is from 1930; portfolio investment is from 1955.

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