Etymology
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Mulligan (n.)

surname, from Gaelic Maolagan, Old Irish Maelecan, a double diminutive of mael "bald," hence "the little bald (or shaven) one," probably often a reference to a monk or disciple. As "stew made with whatever's available" (1904) it is hobo slang, probably from the proper name. The golf sense of "extra stroke after a poor shot" (1949) is sometimes said to be from the name of a Canadian golfer in the 1920s whose friends gave him an extra shot in gratitude for driving them over rough roads to their weekly foursome at St. Lambert Country Club near Montreal.

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Soroptimist 

international society of business women and women executives, first club formed 1921 in Oakland, Calif., U.S., from stem of sorority + optimist, probably after the Optimist Club.

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sand-trap (n.)

1838, in hydraulics, "device for filtering impurities from water," from sand (n.) + trap (n.). As "golf bunker," by 1906.

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foursome (n.)

"four in company," early 14c., from four + -some (2). Specific golf sense is from 1858.

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upswing (n.)

1922, in golf, from up (adv.) + swing (n.). Sense in economics is attested from 1934.

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slice (n.2)

1610s, "a sharp cut," from slice (v.). As "a slicing stroke" (in golf or tennis) it is recorded from 1886.

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follow-through (n.)

1896, of golf swings, from verbal phrase follow through; see follow (v.) + through (adv.). Figurative use from 1926.

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billy (n.)

"club," 1848, American English, originally burglars' slang for "crowbar." The meaning "policeman's club" is recorded by 1856, probably from nickname of William, applied to various objects (compare jack, jimmy, jenny). But compare French bille "a short, stout stick" (see billet (n.1)).

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one-shot (adj.)

1907, "achieved in a single attempt" (original reference is to golf), from one + shot (n.). Meaning "happening or of use only once" is from 1937.

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miniature (adj.)

"on a small scale, much reduced from natural size," 1714, from miniature (n.). Of dog breeds, from 1889. Of golf played on a miniature course, from 1893.

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