Etymology
Advertisement
vorpal (adj.)

1871, invented by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking-Glass" ("Jabberwocky").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
vitreous (adj.)
early 15c., "glasslike," from Latin vitreus "of glass, glassy," from vitrum "glass," which perhaps was so called for its color (compare vitrium "woad"). Vitreous humor attested from 1660s.
Related entries & more 
bugle (n.2)
"glass bead used to ornament dress," 1570s, of unknown origin.
Related entries & more 
spectacles (n.)
"glass lenses to help a person's sight," early 15c., from plural of spectacle. Earlier in singular form (late 14c.).
Related entries & more 
vitriol (n.)
late 14c., "sulphate of iron," from Old French vitriol (13c.), from Medieval Latin vitriolum "vitriol," noun use of neuter of vitriolus, variant of Late Latin vitreolus "of glass," from Latin vitreus "of glass, glassy," from vitrum "glass" (see vitreous). So called from its glassy appearance in certain states. Meaning "bitter or caustic feelings" first attested 1769, in reference to the corrosive properties of vitriol (when heated it produces sulfuric acid, formerly called oil of vitriol).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chortle (v.)

coined 1871 by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking Glass," perhaps from chuckle and snort. Related: Chortled; chortling. As a noun, from 1903.

Related entries & more 
egg-timer (n.)

"sand-glass used for determining the time in boiling eggs," 1873, from egg (n.) + timer.

Related entries & more 
refill (n.)

"an act of filling again; that which serves to refill anything," 1884, from refill (v.). Meaning "a second drink" is from 1929; by 1960 as "the renewed contents of a glass."

Related entries & more 
tumbler (n.)
mid-14c., "acrobat," agent noun from tumble (v.). Compare Old English tumbere "tumbler, dancer." A fem. form was tumblester (early 15c.), tumbester (late 14c.) "female acrobatic dancer." Meaning "drinking glass" is recorded from 1660s, originally a glass with a rounded or pointed bottom which would cause it to "tumble;" thus it could not be set down until it was empty. As a part of a lock mechanism, from 1670s.
Related entries & more 
carboy (n.)
"large globular glass bottle covered with basketwork," 1753, probably ultimately from Persian qarabah "large flagon."
Related entries & more 

Page 3