Etymology
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samite (n.)

c. 1300 (early 13c. in Anglo-Latin), "a type of rich silk cloth," from Old French samit, from Medieval Latin samitum, examitum, from Medieval Greek hexamiton (source of Old Church Slavonic oksamitu, Russian aksamit "velvet"), noun use of neuter of Greek adjective hexamitos "six-threaded," from hex "six" (see six) + mitos "warp thread," a word of uncertain etymology.

The reason it was called this is variously explained; the traditional explanation is that it was woven of six fibers, or in a pattern involving six. Obsolete c. 1600; revived loosely by Tennyson. German Sammet "velvet" is from French.

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sixfold (adj.)

"having six aspects or parts, six times repeated, six times as many or much," Old English sixfeald; see six + -fold. Also as an adverb, "in six ways." Similar formations in Danish sexfold, Dutch zes-voudig; German sechsfältig, Swedish sexfaldig.

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hexameter (adj.)

1540s, from Latin hexameter, from Greek hexametros "of six measures, composed of six feet; hexameter," from hex "six" (see six) + metron "poetic meter" (from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure"). As a noun, "a verse consisting of six measures," from 1570s. Chaucer has the word as exametron. Related: Hexametric.

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sixain (n.)

in prosody, "a stanza of six lines," from French sixain, from Old French sisain, from Medieval Latin sexenus, from Latin sex (See six).

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Sextus 

masc. proper name, from Latin, properly "the sixth," originally denoting a sixth child, from sextus "sixth," from sex "six" (see six; compare Octavian).

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sextuple (adj.)

"sixfold, six times as much," 1620s, ultimately from Latin sextus "sixth" (from sex "six;" see six) + -plus "more; -fold" (see -plus). Compare French sextuple, Spanish sextuplo, Italian sestuplo. As a verb, "multiply by six," from 1630s.

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deepen (v.)

c. 1600, transitive, "to make deep or deeper," from deep (adj.) + -en (1). Intransitive sense of "become deep or deeper" is from 1690s. Related: Deepened; deepening. The earlier verb had been simply deep (Middle English deopen), from Old English diepan.

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baritone (n.)

c. 1600, "male voice between tenor and bass," from Italian baritono, from Greek barytonos "deep-toned, deep-sounding," from barys "heavy, deep," also, of sound, "strong, deep, bass" (from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy") + tonos "tone," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch."

Technically, "ranging from lower A in bass clef to lower F in treble clef." The meaning "singer having a baritone voice" is from 1821. As a type of brass band instrument, it is attested from 1949. As an adjective, by 1729 in reference to the voice, 1854 of musical instruments (originally the concertina).

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sextet (n.)

1841, also sextette, "work for six voices," altered (by influence of German Sextett) from sestet (q.v.). As "company or group of six persons or things" by 1873.

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lake (n.2)

"deep red coloring matter," 1610s, from French laque (15c., see lac), from which it was obtained.

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