Etymology
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endowment (n.)
mid-15c., "action of endowing," from endow + -ment. Meaning "property with which an institution or person is endowed" is from 1590s; that of "gift, power, advantage" is early 17c.
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Nathan 
masc. proper name, biblical prophet, from Hebrew Nathan, literally "he has given," from verb nathan, related to mattan "gift."
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Eudora 

fem. proper name, Greek, literally "generous," fem. of eudoros, from eu "well, good" (see eu-) + dōron "gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give").

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donee (n.)

"person to whom a gift or donation is made," 1520s, from Old French doné, donné, noun use of past-participle of doner, donner; from Latin donare (see donor + -ee).

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Theodosia 
fem. proper name, from Greek Theodosia, literally "gift of the gods," from theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + dosis "a giving," from stem of didonai "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give").
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bribe (n.)
late 14c., "thing stolen," from Old French bribe "a gift," properly "bit, piece, hunk; morsel of bread given to beggars" (14c., compare Old French bribeor "vagrant, beggar"), from briber, brimber "to beg," a general Romanic word (compare Spanish briba "vagrancy," Italian birbone "a vagrant"); Gamillscheg marks the French word as Rotwelsch, i.e. thieves' jargon. The whole group is of uncertain origin; old sources suggest it could be Celtic (compare Breton breva, Welsh briwo "to break") and akin to break (v.). Shift of meaning to "gift given to influence corruptly" is by mid-15c.
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endue (v.)
also indue, c. 1400, "invest (with) some gift, quality, or power" (usually passive), from Old French enduire, induire "lead, drive, initiate, indoctrinate" (12c.) and directly from Latin inducere "to lead" (see induce). Related: Endued.
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testimonial (n.)
"statement, declaration," also "writing testifying to one's qualification or character," early 15c. (from Old French testimonial, variant of tesmoignal), short for letters testimonial (see testimonial (adj.)). Meaning "gift presented as an expression of appreciation" is from 1838.
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glossolalia (n.)

"gift of tongues, speaking in tongues, ability to speak foreign languages without having learned them," 1857 (earlier in German and Italian), from Greek glōssa "tongue, language" (see gloss (n.2)) + lalia "talk, prattle, a speaking," from lalein "to speak, prattle," echoic.

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dacha (n.)

Russian country house or small villa near a town, for summer use, 1896, from Russian dacha, originally "gift" (of land), from Slavic *datja, from PIE root *do- "to give."

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