Etymology
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gasp (n.)
1570s, from gasp (v.). Earliest attested use is in the phrase last gasp "final breath before dying." To gasp up the ghost "die" is attested from 1530s.
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Hemingwayesque (adj.)
1934, in reference to American writer Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961). With -esque.
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pastoralist (n.)

"a writer of pastorals," 1793, from pastoral + -ist. Perhaps modeled on earlier German Pastoralist.

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necrographer (n.)

"a writer of obituary notices," 1808, from necro- "death" + ending as in biographer, etc.

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ghastly (adj.)
c. 1300, gastlich, "inspiring fear or terror, hideous, shocking," with -lich (see -ly (2)) + gast (adj.) "afraid, frightened," past participle of gasten "to frighten," from Old English gæstan "to torment, frighten" (see ghost (n.)). Spelling with gh- developed 16c. from confusion with ghost. Middle English also had gastful in the same sense, but this is now obsolete. Sidney and Shakespeare also used ghastly as an adverb. Related: Ghastliness.
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tragedian (n.)
"writer of tragedies," late 14c., from Old French tragediane (Modern French tragédien), from tragedie (see tragedy). Another word for this was tragician (mid-15c.). Meaning "actor in tragedies" is from 1590s. French-based fem. form tragedienne is from 1851. In late classical Greek, tragodos was the actor, tragodopoios the writer.
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essayist (n.)
"writer of essays," c. 1600, from essay (n.) + -ist. French essayiste (19c.) is from English.
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wegotism (n.)
1797, from we + egotism; "an obtrusive and too frequent use of the first person plural by a speaker or writer" [OED].
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pamphleteer 

1640s as a noun, "a writer of pamphlets," from pamphlet + -eer. As a verb, "to write and issue pamphlets," from 1690s. Related: Pamphleteering.

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wraith (n.)
1510s, "ghost," Scottish, of uncertain origin. Weekley and Century Dictionary suggest Old Norse vorðr "guardian" in the sense of "guardian angel." Klein points to Gaelic and Irish arrach "specter, apparition."
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