Etymology
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slipper (n.)
type of loose, light indoor footwear, late 15c., agent noun from slip (v.), the notion being of a shoe that is "slipped" onto the foot. Old English had slypescoh "slipper," literally "slip-shoe."
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sidetrack (n.)
also side-track, "railway siding," 1835, from side (adj.) + track (n.). The verb meaning "to move (a train car) onto a sidetrack" is from 1874; figurative sense of "to divert from the main purpose" is attested from 1881. Related: Sidetracked.
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fire-engine (n.)
1680s, "engine designed to throw a stream of water through a hose onto a fire for the purpose of extinguishing it," from fire (n.) + engine (n.). Also an early name for a steam engine (1722).
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inundation (n.)

"an overflowing, a flood," early 15c., from Latin inundationem (nominative inundatio) "an overflowing," noun of action from past-participle stem of inundare "to overflow," from in- "onto" (from PIE root *en "in") + undare "to flow," from unda "a wave," from PIE *unda-, nasalized form of root *wed- (1) "water; wet."

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collage (n.)
Origin and meaning of collage

form of abstract art in which photos, newspaper clippings, found objects, etc., are glued onto a surface, 1919 (Wyndham Lewis), from French collage "a pasting," from Old French coller "to glue," from Greek kolla "glue," a word of uncertain origin, perhaps Pre-Greek.

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outflank (v.)

1765, "to extend or get beyond the flank" (of an opposing army), from out- + flank (v.). Figurative use, get the better of, outmaneuver," is from 1773. Related: Outflanked; outflanking.

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beget (v.)
Old English begietan "to get by effort, find, acquire, attain, seize" (class V strong verb, past tense begeat, past participle begeaton), from be- + get (v.). Sense of "to procreate" is from c. 1200, generally used of the father only. Similar formation in Old Saxon bigitan, Old High German pigezzan, Gothic bigitan "to get, obtain." Related: Begot; begotten.
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planisphere (n.)

"map of the heavens made by projection of a portion of the celestial sphere onto a plane surface," late 14c., planisperie, from Anglo-Latin planispherium, Medieval Latin planisphaerium, from Latin planus "flat, level" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread") + sphaera (see sphere (n.)). Related: Planispheric.

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coil (n.)

1620s, "length of rope or cable," a specialized nautical sense from coil (v.). General sense "ring or series of rings in which a pliant body is wound" is from 1660s; hence, such a form forced onto a non-pliant body (1826). Specific sense "electrical conductor wound in a coil" is from 1849. Related: Coils.

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