Etymology
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Sylvia 

fem. proper name, literally "inhabiting woods," from Latin silva "wood, forest" (see sylvan). Also the genus name of warblers, hence adjective Sylvian.

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Quercus (n.)

tree genus, Latin quercus "oak," from PIE *kwerkwu-, assimilated form of *perkwu- "oak" (see fir). Related: Quercine (adj.).

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conus (n.)

1878, "a conical structure or organ," from Latin conus "cone" (see cone). Also the name of the typical genus of the cone-shells.

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gypsophila (n.)

genus of the pink family, 1771, from Modern Latin (Linnaeus), from Greek gypsos "chalk, gypsum" (see gypsum) + philein "to love" (see philo-).

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gerbil (n.)

1849, gerbile, from French gerbille, from Modern Latin Gerbillus, the genus name, from gerbo, from Arabic yarbu. Earlier English form, jarbuah (1660s), was directly from Arabic.

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monkshood (n.)

also monk's-hood, plant of the genus Aconitum, 1570s, from monk (n.) + hood (n.1). So called for the shape of the flowers.

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Macaca 

name of a genus of Old World monkeys, Modern Latin, from Portuguese macaca, fem. of macaco, a name from an African language of the Congo (compare macaque).

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philodendron (n.)

genus of araceous climbing shrubs native to tropical America, 1837, from the Modern Latin genus name (Schott, 1830), from Greek philodendron, neuter of philodendros "loving trees," from philo- "loving" (see philo-) + dendron "tree" (from PIE *der-drew-, from root *deru- "to be firm, solid, steadfast," also forming words for "wood, tree"). The plant so called because it clings to trees.

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viburnum (n.)

genus of shrubs widespread in Eurasia and North America, the wayfaring-tree, 1731, from Latin viburnum, which is said to be probably an Etruscan word.

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volvox (n.)

genus of fresh-water algae, 1798, from Latin volvere "to roll," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve." So called from their motion.

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