Etymology
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capsicum (n.)

the name given to the genus of pepper plants, but it is of unknown origin. Perhaps it is irregularly formed from Latin capsa "box" (see case (n.2)) based on the shape of the fruit. It was adopted as a genus name through the writings of French botanist Joseph Pitton de Tournefort (1656-1708), but he did not explain the word. 

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conus (n.)

1878, "a conical structure or organ," from Latin conus "cone" (see cone). Also the name of the typical genus of the cone-shells.

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monkshood (n.)

also monk's-hood, plant of the genus Aconitum, 1570s, from monk (n.) + hood (n.1). So called for the shape of the flowers.

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gerbil (n.)
1849, gerbile, from French gerbille, from Modern Latin Gerbillus, the genus name, from gerbo, from Arabic yarbu. Earlier English form, jarbuah (1660s), was directly from Arabic.
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brontothere (n.)
extinct genus of gigantic mammals, 1877, Modern Latin, from Greek bronte "thunder" (probably imitative) + Greek therion "beast" (from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast").
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philodendron (n.)

genus of araceous climbing shrubs native to tropical America, 1837, from the Modern Latin genus name (Schott, 1830), from Greek philodendron, neuter of philodendros "loving trees," from philo- "loving" (see philo-) + dendron "tree" (from PIE *der-drew-, from root *deru- "to be firm, solid, steadfast," also forming words for "wood, tree"). The plant so called because it clings to trees.

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Macaca 

name of a genus of Old World monkeys, Modern Latin, from Portuguese macaca, fem. of macaco, a name from an African language of the Congo (compare macaque).

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gypsophila (n.)
genus of the pink family, 1771, from Modern Latin (Linnaeus), from Greek gypsos "chalk, gypsum" (see gypsum) + philein "to love" (see philo-).
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volvox (n.)
genus of fresh-water algae, 1798, from Latin volvere "to roll," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve." So called from their motion.
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monotype (n.)

1881 in biology, "the single or sole type of a species in its genus, a genus in its family, etc.;" 1882 in printers' arts, "a print from a picture painted on a metal plate" (only one proof can be made, as the picture is transferred to the paper); 1893 as a brand name of typesetting machine; see mono- + type. Related: Monotypic (1878 in the biological sense)

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