Etymology
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gene (n.)

1911, from German Gen, coined 1905 by Danish scientist Wilhelm Ludvig Johannsen (1857-1927), from Greek genea "generation, race" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). De Vries had earlier called them pangenes. Gene pool is attested from 1946.

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endothermic (adj.)

1869, originally in chemistry, "causing, relating to, or requiring the absorption of heat," from French endothermique (1868, Berthelot); see endo- + thermal. By 1947 in biology, "dependent on or capable of the internal generation of heat; warm-blooded."

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theogony (n.)
1610s, "the account of the birth or genealogy of the gods," from Greek theogonia "generation or genealogy of the gods," from theos "a god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + -gonia "a begetting," from gonos "birth" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget").
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monogeny (n.)

1856; "generation of an individual from one parent which develops both male and female products;" 1865, "theory that humankind originated from a single pair of ancestors;" see mono- + -geny. In the first sense, monogenesis (1866, from Modern Latin) has been used; monogenetic has been used in both senses. Related: Monogenism.

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eon (n.)

1640s, from Late Latin aeon, from Greek aiōn "age, vital force; a period of existence, a lifetime, a generation; a long space of time," in plural, "eternity," from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life, long life, eternity." Related: Eonian; eonic.

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-genesis 

word-forming element meaning "birth, origin, creation," from Greek genesis "origin, creation, generation," from gignesthai "to be born," related to genos "race, birth, descent" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

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genesis (n.)
Old English Genesis, first book of the Pentateuch, which tells among other things of the creation of the world, from Latin genesis "generation, nativity," in Late Latin taken as the title of first book of the Old Testament, from Greek genesis "origin, creation, generation," from gignesthai "to be born," related to genos "race, birth, descent" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

Greek translators used the word as the title of the biblical book, rendering Hebrew bereshith, literally "in the beginning," which was the first word of the text, taken as its title. Extended sense of "origin, creation" first recorded in English c. 1600.
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genitalia (n.)
"the genital organs," 1876, Modern Latin, from Latin genitalia (membra), neuter plural of genitalis "genital, pertaining to generation or birth" (see genital). The Latin word also yielded, with change of suffix, French génitoires (12c.), hence Middle English and early Modern English genitors "genitals."
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posterity (n.)

"a person's offspring, descendants collectively," late 14c., posterite, from Old French posterité (14c.), from Latin posteritatem (nominative posteritas) "future, future time; after-generation, offspring;" literally "the condition of coming after," from posterus "coming after, subsequent," from post "after" (see post-). Old English words for this included æftercneoreso, framcynn.

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nake (v.)

"to make naked," mid-14c., naken, from naked, perhaps with misapprehension of the -d as a past tense suffix. Marked as "Obs[olete] exc[ept] Sc[ottish]" in OED. Earlier was naken "to strip naked" (mid-13c.); a later generation coined nakedize (1858).

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