Etymology
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tiff (n.)
1727, "outburst of temper," later "petty quarrel" (1754), of uncertain origin; OED suggests imitative, "from the sound of a slight puff of air or gas."
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depressurize (v.)

"cause a drop in the pressure of a gas in a certain space," 1944; see de- + pressurize. Related: Depressurized; depressurizing; depressurization.

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aspirator (n.)

"apparatus for drawing air or gas through a tube," 1845, agent noun from Latin aspirare (see aspire (v.)).

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Calor (n.)

proprietary name for a type of liquid gas sold in Britain, 1936, from Latin calor, literally "heat" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm").

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coal-tar (n.)

"thick, black, viscid liquid left by the distillation of gas from coal," 1785, from coal (n.) + tar (n.).

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laughing (n.)

mid-14c., verbal noun from laugh (v.). Laughing matter (usually with negative) is from 1560s. Nitrous oxide has been called laughing gas since 1842 (for its exhilarating effects). Humphry Davy, experimenting with the gas, discovered these as far back as 1779: "When I took the bag from my mouth, I immediately laughed. The laughter was involuntary, but highly pleasurable, accompanied by a thrill all through me."

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superheat (v.)
1827 (implied in superheated) "to heat to a very high degree," specifically of steam until it resembles a perfect gas, from super- + heat (v.). Related: Superheating.
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blow-pipe (n.)
1680s, "instrument to carry a current of air or gas to a flame, jet, etc.;" 1825 as a type of weapon, "blow-gun;" from blow (v.1) + pipe (n.1).
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electronics (n.)
1910, from electronic; also see -ics. The science of how electrons behave in vacuums, gas, semi-conductors, etc.
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carbonate (v.)
1805, "to form into a carbonate," from carbonate (n.) by influence of French carbonater "transform into a carbonate." Meaning "to impregnate with carbonic acid gas (i.e. carbon dioxide)" is from 1850s. Related: Carbonated; carbonating.
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