Etymology
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ninepins (n.)

"the game of bowls, played in an alley," 1570s, from nine + plural of pin (n.). From the number of pins to be knocked down. The game also was known as nine-pegs (1670s). Nine-holes(1570s) was a once-popular game in which players roll small balls at 9 holes made in a board or on the ground.

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pinochle (n.)

once-popular American game played with a double 24-card pack, originally German, also pinocle, etc., 1864, Peaknuckle, of obscure origin (as are the names of many card games), evidently from Swiss dialect Binokel (German), binocle (French), from French binocle "pince-nez" (17c.), from Medieval Latin binoculus "binoculars" (see binocular).

Binokel was the name of a card game played in Württemberg, related to the older card game bezique and the name is perhaps from French bésigue "bezique," the card game, wrongly identified with besicles "spectacles," perhaps because the game is played with a double deck. Pinochle was popularized in U.S. late 1800s by German immigrants.

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baseball (n.)

in the modern sense of a game of ball for teams of nine, 1845, American English, from base (n.) + ball (n.1). Earlier references, such as in Jane Austen's "Northanger Abbey," refer to the game of rounders, of which baseball is a more elaborate variety. The modern game was legendarily invented 1839 by Abner Doubleday in Cooperstown, N.Y. Base was used for "start or finish line of a race" from 1690s; and the sense of "safe spot" found in modern children's game of tag can be traced to 15c. (the use in reference to the bags in modern baseball is from 1868). Baseball as "ball with which the game of baseball is played" is by 1885.

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racquetball (n.)

game played with racquets and a light ball in an enclosed court, 1972, from racquet + ball (n.1). Earlier, racket-ball was "ball used in a racquet game" (1650s).

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taw (n.)
"a game at marbles," 1709, of unknown origin.
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cribbage (n.)

card game for two or four, 1620s, probably from crib "set of cards thrown from each player's hand" (which is of uncertain origin), though this word is later than the game name.

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piquet (n.)

complicated two-person game played with a 32-card pack, 1640s, from French piquet, picquet (16c.), a name of uncertain origin, as are many card-game names, and it comes trailing the usual cloud of fanciful and absurd speculations. Perhaps it is a diminutive of pic "pick, pickaxe, pique," from the suit of spades, or from the phrase faire pic, a term said to be used in the game. In the game, a pique was a winning of 30 points before one's opponent scored at all in the same hand. But its earlier name in French (16c.) was Cent, from its target score of 100 points. The classic aristocratic two-handed game, and the unofficial national card game of France, it faded after World War I in the face of simpler, more democratic games. Compare kaput.

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retriever (n.)

late 15c., "dog used to set up game again," agent noun from retrieve (v.). As "one of a breed specially suited to search for and fetch dead or wounded game" is by 1830.

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gleek (n.)
old three-person card game, 1530s, from French glic, ghelicque (15c.), perhaps from Middle Dutch ghelic (Dutch gelijk) "like, alike" because one of the goals of the game is collecting three cards of the same rank.
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skittles (n.)
game played with nine pins, 1630s, plural of skittle, the word for the pins used in the game, probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Danish and Norwegian skyttel "shuttle, child's toy"). But OED says there is no evidence of a connection.
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