Etymology
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gallimaufry (n.)
"a medley, hash, hodge-podge," 1550s, from French galimafrée "hash, ragout, dish made of odds and ends," from Old French galimafree, calimafree "sauce made of mustard, ginger, and vinegar; a stew of carp" (14c.), which is of unknown origin. Perhaps from Old French galer "to make merry, live well" (see gallant) + Old North French mafrer "to eat much," from Middle Dutch maffelen [Klein]. Weekley sees in the second element the proper name Maufré. Hence, figuratively, "any inconsistent or absurd medley."
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Galatians (n.)
Biblical epistle, from Galatia, name of an ancient inland region in Asia Minor, from Greek Galatia, based on Gaul, in reference to the Gaulish people who conquered the region and settled there 3c. B.C.E. In Latin Gallograeci, hence Middle English Gallocrecs "the Gallatians."
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Gallo-Roman (adj.)
"belonging to Gaul when it was part of the Roman Empire," from combining form of Gaul + Roman. In reference to a language, and as a noun, the language spoken in France from the end of the fifth century C.E. to the middle of the ninth, a form of Vulgar Latin with local modifications and additions from Gaulish that then, in the region around Paris, developed into what linguists call Old French.
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galacto- 
before vowels galact-, word-forming element meaning "milk, milky," from Greek gala (stem galakt-; see galaxy).
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Galen 
celebrated Greek physician of 2c.; his work still was a foundation of medicine in the Middle Ages and his name is used figuratively for doctors.
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galley-slave (n.)
1560s, from galley (n.) in the "ship" sense + slave (n.). The ships were often rowed by slaves or convicts.
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gallipot (n.)
"small glazed pot," mid-15c., of uncertain origin; perhaps from French, perhaps literally "galley pot," meaning one imported from the Mediterranean on galleys.
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Gallomania (n.)

"excessive or undue enthusiasm for France and all things French," 1797, from combining form of Gaul + mania. Jefferson used adjective Gallomane (1787). Compare Anglomania, which might have served as the model for this word.

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galvanise (v.)
chiefly British English spelling of galvanize; for suffix, see -ize. Related: Galvanised; galvanising.
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