Etymology
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four-flusher (n.)
"cheat, dishonest person," 1900, from verb four-flush "to bluff a poker hand, claim a flush (n.) while holding only four cards in the suit" (1896).
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yak (n.)
"wild ox of central Asia," 1795, from Tibetan g-yag "male yak." Attested in French from 1791.
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trump (n.1)
"playing card of a suit ranking above others," 1520s, alteration of triumph (n.), which also was the name of a card game.
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ruff (n.2)

in card-playing, "act of trumping when a player has no cards of the suit led," by 1856, from ruff (v.) "trump when unable to follow suit" (1760), from the name of the old game of ruff (1580s), from French roffle, earlier romfle (early 15c.), from Italian ronfa, which is perhaps a corruption of trionfo "triumph" (from French; compare trump (n.1)). The old game, a predecessor of whist, was in vogue c. 1590-1630. 

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singleton (n.)
"single card of a suit in a hand," 1876, originally in whist, from single (adj.); compare simpleton, etc. Extended early 20c. to other instances of singularity.
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bathing (n.)
1540s, verbal noun from bathe (v.). Bathing suit is recorded from 1852 (bathing costume from 1830); bathing beauty is from 1891, in reference to Frederick Leighton's "The Bath of Venus."
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plaintiff (n.)

in law, "the person who begins a suit before a tribunal for the recovery of a claim" (opposed to defendant), c. 1400, pleintif, from Anglo-French pleintif (late 13c.), from noun use of Old French plaintif "complaining; wretched, miserable," in law, "aggrieved" (as in partie plaintif "the party bringing a suit at law"), from plainte (see plaint). Identical with plaintive at first; the form that receded into legal usage retained the older -iff spelling.

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pleading (n.)

mid-14c., "debate, dispute;" late 14c., "litigation, the carrying on of a suit at court," verbal noun from plead (v.). Meaning "supplication, intercession" is from early 15c.

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ruff (v.)

in cards, "trump when unable to follow suit," 1760, from the card game ruff (see ruff (n.2)). Related: Ruffed; ruffing.

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suite (n.)
1670s, "train of followers or attendants," from French suite, from Old French suite, sieute "act of following, attendance" (see suit (n.), which is an earlier borrowing of the same French word). The meanings "set of instrumental compositions" (1680s), "connected set of rooms" (1716), and "set of furniture" (1805) were imported from French usages or re-spelled on the French model from suit in its sense of "a number of things taken collectively and constituting a sequence; collection of things of like kind."
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