Etymology
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mock (v.)

mid-15c., mokken, "make fun of," also "to trick, delude, make a fool of; treat with scorn, treat derisively or contemptuously;" from Old French mocquer "deride, jeer," a word of unknown origin. Perhaps from Vulgar Latin *muccare "to blow the nose" (as a derisive gesture), from Latin mucus; or possibly from Middle Dutch mocken "to mumble" or Middle Low German mucken "grumble." Perhaps ultimately it is imitative of such speech. Related: Mocked; mocking. Replaced Old English bysmerian. The sense of "imitate, simulate, resemble closely" (1590s, as in mockingbird ; also see mock (adj.)) is from the notion of derisive imitation.

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toy (n.)

c. 1300, "amorous playing, sport," later "piece of fun or entertainment" (c. 1500), "thing of little value, trifle" (1520s), and "thing for a child to play with" (1580s). Of uncertain origin, and there may be more than one word here. Compare Middle Dutch toy, Dutch tuig "tools, apparatus; stuff, trash," in speeltuig "play-toy, plaything;" German Zeug "stuff, matter, tools," Spielzeug "plaything, toy;" Danish tøj, Swedish tyg "stuff, gear." Applied as an adjective to things of diminutive size, especially dogs, from 1806. Toy-boy is from 1981.

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funeral (n.)

"ceremony of burying a dead person," 1510s, probably short for funeral service, etc., from funeral (adj.).

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functional (adj.)

1630s, "pertaining to function or office," from function (n.) + -al (1), or from Medieval Latin functionalis. Meaning "utilitarian" is by 1864; specific use in architecture is from 1928. Related: Functionally; functionality.

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functionary (n.)

"one who has a certain function, one who holds an office," 1791, from or patterned on French fonctionnaire, a word of the Revolution; from fonction (see function (n.)). As an adjective in English from 1822, "functional." Related: Functionarism.

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fungal (adj.)

1835, from Modern Latin fungalis, from fungus (see fungus). As a noun, "a fungus" (1845). Earlier adjective was fungic 1804.

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fungi (n.)

Latin plural of fungus. In biology, in reference to one of the lowest of the great groups of cellular cryptograms.

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fundus (n.)

"bottom, depths; base of an organ," 1754, from Latin fundus "bottom" (see fund (n.)). In any general use it probably is extended from specific senses in anatomy.

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funerary (adj.)

"pertaining to funerals or burials," 1690s, from Late Latin funerarius, from funer-, stem of funus "a funeral" (see funeral (adj.)).

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functionalism (n.)

1892, "functionality;" 1902 as a term in social sciences; from functional + -ism. In architecture from 1930. Related: functionalist.

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