Etymology
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brimful (adj.)

also brim-full, "full to the top," 1520s, from brim (n.) + -ful.

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cavernous (adj.)

c. 1400, "full of caverns," from Latin cavernosus "full of cavities" (source also of Italian cavernoso, French caverneux), from caverna (see cavern). In English, the meaning "full of cavities, porous" is from 1590s. The meaning "deeply hollowed out" is recorded from 1830.

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fill (n.)

mid-13c., fille, "a full supply," from Old English fyllu "fullness, 'fill,' feast, satiety," from Proto-Germanic *full-ino- "fullness" (source also of Old High German fulli, German Fülle, Old Norse fyllr), noun of state from *fullaz "full" (see full (adj.)). Meaning "extra material in music" is from 1934.

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plenipotentiary (adj.)

"invested with, having, or bestowing full power," 1640s, from French plénipotentiaire and directly from Medieval Latin plenipotentiarius "having full power," from Late Latin plenipotens, from Latin plenus "complete, full" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + potentem "powerful" (see potent). As a noun from 1650s, "person invested with full powers to transact any business," especially with reference to an ambassador to a foreign court or government, given full power to negotiate a treaty or transact other business.

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stuffy (adj.)

1550s, "full of stuff, full of substance" (obsolete); 1831 as "poorly ventilated;" from stuff (n.) + -y (2). Sense of "pompous, smug" is from 1895. Related: Stuffily; stuffiness.

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meaty (adj.)

"full of meat, fleshy," 1787, from meat (n.) + -y (2). Figurative sense "full of substance, pithy" is by 1881. Meaning "resembling meat" is by 1864. Related: Meatiness.

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luminous (adj.)

early 15c., "full of light, shiny," from Latin luminosus "shining, full of light, conspicuous," from lumen (genitive luminis) "light," from suffixed form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness." Related: Luminously; luminousness.

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peppy (adj.)

"full of pep," 1915, from pep + -y (2).

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chary (adj.)

Old English cearig "sorrowful, full of care," the adjective from care (n.), q.v. The sense evolved 16c. from "full of care" to "careful." Compare the sense evolution of careful. The meaning "sparing, frugal" is from 1560s. Cognate with Old Saxon carag, Old High German charag "full of sorrow, trouble, or care." Related: Charily; chariness.

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sententious (adj.)

mid-15c., sentencious, "full of meaning" (a sense now obsolete); late 15c., "full of pithy sentences or sayings;" from Latin sententiosus "full of meaning, pithy," from sententia "thought; expression of a thought" (see sentence (n.)). Meaning "addicted to pompous moralizing, given to the use of pithy sayings" is recorded from 1590s. Related: Sententiously; sententiousness.

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