Etymology
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off-site (adj.)

"occurring away from a site," 1956, from off (prep.) + site (n.).

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off-chance (n.)

"a remote chance," 1861, from off (prep.) + chance (n.).

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off-street (adj.)

1929, in reference to automobile parking, "not on a public street," from off (prep.) + street.

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off-and-on (adv.)

"intermittently, occasionally," 1530s; see off (adv.) + on. As an adjective, "occasional," from 1580s.

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cast-off (adj.)

1709, "put aside, rejected," from verbal phrase cast off "discard, reject" (c. 1400), from cast (v.) + off (adv.). From 1741 as a noun, "person or thing abandoned as worthless or useless." Related" Cast-offs.

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lead-off (n.)
"commencement, beginning," 1879, from verbal phrase (attested from 1806); see lead (v.1) + off (adv.).
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well-off (adj.)
1733, "comfortable," from well (adv.) + off. Meaning "prosperous, not poor" is recorded from 1849.
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trade-off (n.)
also tradeoff, "sacrifice of one benefit for another," 1959, from verbal phrase to trade off; see trade (v.) + off (adv.).
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off-road (adj.)

"used, meant to be used, or taking place away from roads," 1949, from off- (adj.) (see off (prep.)) + road.

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push-off (n.)

"act of pushing off" (a boat, from the land), 1902, from the verbal phrase; see push (v.) + off (adv.).

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