Etymology
Advertisement
free-for-all (n.)
"mass brawl" (one in which all may participate), 1918, from earlier adjective use (1868), especially in reference to open horse races, American English. Earlier as a noun in reference to free-for-all horse and motorcar races.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hepatic (adj.)

late 14c., epatike, from Old French hepatique or directly from Latin hepaticus "pertaining to the liver," from Greek hēpatikos, from hēpar (genitive hēpatos) "liver" (see hepatitis). As a noun, "medicine for the liver," from late 15c.

Related entries & more 
liverwurst (n.)
also liver-wurst, 1852, partial translation of German Leberwurst "liver-sausage," from Leber "liver" (see liver (n.1)) + Wurst "sausage" (see wurst).
Related entries & more 
heparin (n.)

substance found in the liver, lungs and other tissues, 1918, from Greek hēpar "liver" (see hepatitis) + -in (2).

Related entries & more 
hepatitis (n.)

1727, from Greek hēpatos, genitive of hepar "liver," from PIE root *yekwr- (source also of Sanskrit yakrt, Avestan yakar, Persian jigar, Latin jecur, Old Lithuanian jeknos "liver") + -itis "inflammation."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
liverwort (n.)
late Old English liferwyrt, from lifer (see liver (n.1)) + wyrt (see wort). A loan-translation of Medieval Latin hepatica. Applied to various plants with liver-shaped leaves or that were used to treat liver disorders. Similar formation in German leberkraut.
Related entries & more 
lily-livered (adj.)
"cowardly," 1605, in "Macbeth;" from lily (in its color sense of "pale, bloodless") + liver (n.1), which was a supposed seat of love and passion. A healthy liver is typically dark reddish-brown. Other similar expressions: lily-handed "having white, delicate hands," lily-faced "pale-faced; affectedly modest or sensitive."
Related entries & more 
foie-gras (n.)

1818, French, short for pâté de foie gras (1827 in English), literally "pie of fat liver;" originally served in a pastry (as still in Alsace), the phrase now chiefly in English with reference to the filling. French foie "liver" is cognate with Italian fegato, from Latin *ficatum. For pâté see pâté (n.2); for gras see grease (n.).

Related entries & more 
cirrhosis (n.)

"chronic inflammation of connective tissue," originally and especially of the liver, 1827, coined in Modern Latin by French physician René-Théophile-Hyacinthe Laennec with -osis and Greek kirros "red-yellow, yellow-brown, tawny," which is of unknown origin. The form is erroneous, presuming Greek *kirrhos. So called for the orange-yellow appearance of the diseased liver. Related: Cirrhotic.

Related entries & more 
ox-gall (n.)

"bitter fluid secreted by the liver of an ox, used in paints and coloring," 1630s, from ox + gall (n.1).

Related entries & more 

Page 3