Etymology
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free-hand (adv.)
of drawing, "done without guiding instruments such as engineer's curves," 1848; see free (adj.) + hand (n.).
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free-for-all (n.)
"mass brawl" (one in which all may participate), 1918, from earlier adjective use (1868), especially in reference to open horse races, American English. Earlier as a noun in reference to free-for-all horse and motorcar races.
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hepatic (adj.)

late 14c., epatike, from Old French hepatique or directly from Latin hepaticus "pertaining to the liver," from Greek hēpatikos, from hēpar (genitive hēpatos) "liver" (see hepatitis). As a noun, "medicine for the liver," from late 15c.

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liverwurst (n.)
also liver-wurst, 1852, partial translation of German Leberwurst "liver-sausage," from Leber "liver" (see liver (n.1)) + Wurst "sausage" (see wurst).
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heparin (n.)

substance found in the liver, lungs and other tissues, 1918, from Greek hēpar "liver" (see hepatitis) + -in (2).

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hepatitis (n.)

1727, from Greek hēpatos, genitive of hepar "liver," from PIE root *yekwr- (source also of Sanskrit yakrt, Avestan yakar, Persian jigar, Latin jecur, Old Lithuanian jeknos "liver") + -itis "inflammation."

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liverwort (n.)
late Old English liferwyrt, from lifer (see liver (n.1)) + wyrt (see wort). A loan-translation of Medieval Latin hepatica. Applied to various plants with liver-shaped leaves or that were used to treat liver disorders. Similar formation in German leberkraut.
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lily-livered (adj.)
"cowardly," 1605, in "Macbeth;" from lily (in its color sense of "pale, bloodless") + liver (n.1), which was a supposed seat of love and passion. A healthy liver is typically dark reddish-brown. Other similar expressions: lily-handed "having white, delicate hands," lily-faced "pale-faced; affectedly modest or sensitive."
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foie-gras (n.)

1818, French, short for pâté de foie gras (1827 in English), literally "pie of fat liver;" originally served in a pastry (as still in Alsace), the phrase now chiefly in English with reference to the filling. French foie "liver" is cognate with Italian fegato, from Latin *ficatum. For pâté see pâté (n.2); for gras see grease (n.).

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*leip- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to stick, adhere; fat."

It forms all or part of: adipose; beleave; delay; leave (v.); lebensraum; life; liparo-; lipo- (1) "fat;" lipoma; liposuction; lively; live (v.); liver (n.1) "secreting organ of the body;" Olaf; relay.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek liparein "to persist, persevere," aleiphein "anoint with oil," lipos "fat;" Old English lifer "liver," læfan "to allow to remain."
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