Etymology
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xenophile (n.)

1922, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phile.

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xenolith (n.)
1894, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -lith "stone."
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Gallagher 
surname, from Irish Gallchobhar "foreign-help." Compare Galloway.
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snick (n.)
1962, American English, from common pronunciation of SNCC, initialism (acronym) for "Student Non-violent Co-ordinating Committee," black civil rights organization.
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Comintern (n.)

"international organization of the Communist Party," founded 1919, from contraction of Communist International and modeled on Russian Komintern.

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xenophobe (n.)
1897, from xeno- "foreign, strange" + -phobe. As an adjective from 1908.
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insider (n.)
"one in possession of special information by virtue of being within some organization," 1848, from inside (n.) + -er (1). Originally in reference to the stock markets.
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alien (adj.)

c. 1300, "strange, foreign," from Old French alien "strange, foreign;" as a noun, "an alien, stranger, foreigner," from Latin alienus "of or belonging to another, not one's own, foreign, strange," also, as a noun, "a stranger, foreigner," adjective from alius (adv.) "another, other, different," from PIE root *al- (1) "beyond."

Meaning "residing in a country not of one's birth" is from mid-15c. Sense of "wholly different in nature" is from 1670s. Meaning "not of this Earth" first recorded 1920. An alien priory (mid 15c.) is one owing obedience to a religious jurisdiction in a foreign country.

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strange (adj.)

late 13c., straunge, "from elsewhere, foreign, unknown, unfamiliar, not belonging to the place where found," from Old French estrange "foreign, alien, unusual, unfamiliar, curious; distant; inhospitable; estranged, separated" (Anglo-French estraunge, strange, straunge; Modern French étrange), from Latin extraneus "foreign, external, from without" (source also of Italian strano "strange, foreign," Spanish extraño), from extra "outside of" (see extra-). In early use also strounge. The surname Lestrange is attested from late 12c. Sense of "queer, surprising" is attested from c. 1300, also "aloof, reserved, distant; estranged." In nuclear physics, from 1956.

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ball-club (n.)
also ballclub, "association of players of a ball game," 1845, from ball (n.1) + club (n.) in the "social organization" sense.
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