Etymology
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dynamism (n.)

1831, "dynamic energy, force, drive," from Greek dynamis "power, might, strength" (see dynamic (adj.)) + -ism. As a name for philosophical systems that require some force to explain the phenomena of nature, by 1857.

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impetus (n.)

early 15c., impetous "rapid movement, rush;" 1640s, with modern spelling, "force with which a body moves, driving force," from Latin impetus "an attack, assault; rapid motion; an impulse; violence, vigor, force;" figuratively "ardor, passion," from impetere "to attack," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + petere "aim for, rush at" (from PIE root *pet- "to rush, to fly").

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volt (n.)

unit of electromotive force, 1873, back-formation from voltaic.

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hatha-yoga (n.)

1911, from Sanskrit hatha "force, violence, forced meditation" + yoga (see yoga).

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actuation (n.)

"a putting in motion, communication of force," 1620s, noun of action from actuate (v.).

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momentum (n.)

1690s in the scientific use in mechanics, "product of the mass and velocity of a body; quantity of motion of a moving body," from Latin momentum "movement, moving power" (see moment). Figurative use, "force gained by movement, an impulse, impelling force," dates from 1782.

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dyne (n.)

in physics, the metric unit of force, 1873, from a specialized scientific use of of Greek dynamis "power" (see dynamic (adj.)); perhaps also influenced by French dyne, which had been proposed c. 1842 as a unit of force in a different sense.

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isodynamic (adj.)

"having equal power or force," 1827, from iso- "the same, equal" + dynamic (adj.).

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eon (n.)

1640s, from Late Latin aeon, from Greek aiōn "age, vital force; a period of existence, a lifetime, a generation; a long space of time," in plural, "eternity," from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life, long life, eternity." Related: Eonian; eonic.

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plunder (n.)

"goods taken from an enemy by force; act or action of plundering," 1640s, from plunder (v.).

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