Etymology
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carry-out (adj.)
of food and drink, "prepared to be consumed away from the place of sale," 1935, American English, from the verbal phrase, from carry (v.) + out (adv.). Compare takeaway, takeout, which have the same sense.
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go out (v.)
early 13c., "leave home," from go (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "become extinct, expire" is from c. 1400.
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make out (v.)

c. 1600, "get along, succeed," from make (v.) + out (adv.). Sense of "obtain a clear understanding of" is from 1640s; that of "discern or discover visually" is by 1754; sense of "have sexual relations with" is attested by 1939.

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cut-out (n.)

also cutout, 1851, in reference to a kind of switch on a circuit to cut out an instrument, from the verbal phrase, from cut (v.) + out (adv.). The verbal phrase is attested from c. 1400 as "cut so as to take out;" from 1550s as "fashion or shape by cutting;" from 1736 as "remove, excise, omit." From 1640s as "be naturally formed or fashioned" (for some specified purpose).

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inside-out (adj.)

"with the in side being out," c. 1600, from inside (n.) + out (prep.). Reverse in form but identical in sense outside-in is attested by 1771.

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out-thrust (adj.)

"to extend or project outward," 1820, from out- + thrust (v.). Related: Out-thrusting.

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print-out (n.)

1899, "image reproduced by other means than chemical photographic development," from the verbal phrase print out (by 1884); see print (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "sheet of printed matter produced by a computer or other automatic apparatus" is by 1953.

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phase-out (n.)

"gradual, planned removal or elimination," 1958, from the verbal phrase (1954; see phase (v.)).

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out-take (n.)

also outtake, "rejected part of a film," 1960, from out- + take (n.) in the movie sense. Related: Out-takes.

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turn-out (n.)
"audience, assemblage of persons who have come to see a show, spectacle, etc.," 1816, from the verbal phrase; see turn (v.) + out (adv.).
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