Etymology
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flux (n.)
late 14c., "abnormally copious flow," from Old French flus "a flowing, a rolling; a bleeding" (Modern French flux), or directly from Latin fluxus (adj.) "flowing, loose, slack," past participle of fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Originally "excessive flow" (of blood or excrement), it also was an early name for "dysentery;" sense of "continuous succession of changes" is first recorded 1620s. The verb is early 15c., from the noun.
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cantabile (adj.)
of music, "executed in the style of a song, smooth and flowing," 1724, from Italian, literally "singable, that can be sung," from cantare "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").
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liquid (n.)
"a liquid substance," 1708, from liquid (adj.). Earlier it meant "sound of a liquid consonant" (1520s), following Latin liquidae, Greek hygra, applied to letters of an easy, "flowing" sound.
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affluent (adj.)
early-15c., "abounding in, copious" (of God's grace); mid-15c. "flowing to" (of liquids), both senses now obsolete, from Old French afluent (14c.) or directly from Latin affluentem (nominative affluens) "abounding, rich, copious," literally "flowing toward," present participle of affluere "flow toward," from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). The especial sense of "abounding in wealth or possessions" is from 1753.
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raceway (n.)

1828, "artificial passage for water flowing from a fall or dam," from race (n.3) + way (n.). Meaning "automobile race course" is by 1936, from race (n.1).

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serum (n.)

1670s, "watery animal fluid," especially the clear pale-yellow liquid which separates in coagulation of blood in wounds, etc., from Latin serum "watery fluid, whey." This is held to be from PIE *sero- "flowing, liquid," from verbal root *ser- "to run, flow" (source also of Greek oros "whey, watery parts of curdled milk;" Sanskrit sarah "flowing, liquid," sarit "brook, river"). The word was applied by 1893 to blood serum used in medical treatments.

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effluvium (n.)
1640s, from Latin effluvium "a flowing out, an outlet," from effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Related: Effluvial.
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rheostat (n.)

1843, "instrument for regulating or adjusting the resistance in a circuit," coined by English inventor Charles Wheatstone from Greek rheos "a flowing, stream" (see rheo-) + -stat "regulating device." Related: Rheostatic.

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fluctuate (v.)
1630s, from Latin fluctuatus, past participle of fluctuare "to undulate, to move in waves," from fluctus "a wave, billow, surge, a flowing," from past participle of fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Related: Fluctuated; fluctuates; fluctuating.
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flood (n.)
Old English flōd "a flowing of water, tide, an overflowing of land by water, a deluge, Noah's Flood; mass of water, river, sea, wave," from Proto-Germanic *floduz "flowing water, deluge" (source also of Old Frisian flod, Old Norse floð, Middle Dutch vloet, Dutch vloed, German Flut, Gothic flodus), from suffixed form of PIE verbal root *pleu- "to flow" (also the source of flow). In early modern English often floud. Figurative use, "a great quantity, a sudden abundance," by mid-14c.
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