Etymology
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fireplug (n.)

also fire-plug, 1713, from fire (n.) + plug (n.).

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wildfire (n.)

late Old English wilde fyr "destructive fire" (perhaps caused by lightning); also "erysipelas, spreading skin disease;" see wild (adj.) + fire (n.). From c. 1300 as "Greek fire," also fire rained down from the sky as divine retribution. Figurative sense from late 14c. By 1795 as "sheet lightning."

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fireplace (n.)

also fire-place, c. 1700, from fire (n.) + place (n.).

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firebrand (n.)

also fire-brand, c. 1200, "piece of wood kindled at a fire, a piece of something burning," from fire (n.) + brand (n.). Used for spreading fire. Figurative sense of "one who kindles mischief or passions" is from late 14c.

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fiery (adj.)

late 13c., "flaming, full of fire," from Middle English fier "fire" (see fire (n.)) + -y (2). The spelling is a relic of one of the attempts to render Old English "y" in fyr in a changing system of vowel sounds. Other Middle English spellings include firi, furi, fuiri, vuiri, feri. From c. 1400 as "blazing red." Of persons, from late 14c. Related: Fieriness. As adjectives Old English had fyrbære "fiery, fire-bearing;" fyren "of fire, fiery, on fire;" fyrenful; fyrhat "hot as fire."

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pyre (n.)

"pile or heap of wood or other combustible materials for burning a dead body," 1650s, from Latin pyra and directly from Greek pyra (Ionic pyrē) "funeral pyre; altar for sacrifice; watch-fire; hearth; any place where fire is kindled," from pyr "fire" (from PIE root *paewr- "fire," source also of fire (n.)). Related: Pyral.

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firewall (n.)

also fire-wall, 1851 as a physical wall meant to prevent the spread of fire in a structure, from fire (n.) + wall (n.). Computer sense (originally figurative) is by 1990.

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surefire (adj.)

also sure-fire, by 1864, American English, from sure + fire (v.). Originally of rifles.

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brushfire (n.)

also brush-fire, "a blaze in brush or scrub," 1848, from brush (n.2) + fire (n.).

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fireworks (n.)

also fire-works, "pyrotechnic contrivances," 1570s, from fire (n.) + works. Figurative use from 1660s.

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