Etymology
Advertisement
upshot (n.)
1530s, from up (adj.) + shot (n.); originally, the final shot in an archery match, hence the figurative sense of "result, issue, conclusion" (c. 1600).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
-worth 

as final element in place names (and thence surnames), from Old English worþ "enclosed place, homestead." Also -worthy (Old English worþig).

Related entries & more 
gasp (n.)
1570s, from gasp (v.). Earliest attested use is in the phrase last gasp "final breath before dying." To gasp up the ghost "die" is attested from 1530s.
Related entries & more 
Tyrone 
Irish county, from Irish Tir Eoghain "Eoghan's Land," from Eoghan "Owen," ancestor of the O'Neills, who owned land here. Tir also forms the final syllable in Leinster, Munster, Ulster.
Related entries & more 
omega (n.)

final letter of the Greek alphabet, c. 1400, from Medieval Greek omega, from classical Greek o mega "big 'o' " (in contrast to o micron "little 'o' "); so called because the vowel was long in ancient Greek. From o + megas "great, large, vast, big, high, tall; mighty, important" (from PIE root *meg- "great"). Used figuratively for "the last, the final" of anything (as in Revelation i.8) from 1520s.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
quietus (n.)

"release or discharge from debt, a final clearing of accounts," 1530s, short for Medieval Latin phrase quietus est "he is quit," from quietus "free" (in Medieval Latin "free from war, debts, etc."), also "calm, resting" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet"). The full Latin phrase was used in English from early 15c. Hence, "death" (i.e. "final discharge"), c. 1600. Latin quies also was used for "the peace of death."

Related entries & more 
bottom line (n.)

figurative sense is attested from 1832, from profit-and-loss accounting, where the final figure calculated is the bottom line on the page. Also (especially as an adjective) bottom-line, bottomline.

Related entries & more 
Rhadamanthus (n.)

name of one of the three judges of the Underworld in Greek mythology, son of Zeus and Europa, from Latinized form of Greek Rhadamanthos, whose name seems to contain Greek rhadamos "branch, twig, shoot." Used in English from 1580s allusively of inflexible judges or solid and final judgment. Related: Rhadamantine; Rhadamanthean.

Related entries & more 
penultima (n.)

"last syllable but one of a word or verse, a penult," 1580s, from Latin pænultima (syllaba), "the next to the last syllable of a word or verse," from fem. of Latin adjective pænultimus "next-to-last," from pæne "almost" (a word of uncertain origin) + ultimus "final" (see ultimate).

Related entries & more 
villanelle (n.)
poetic form (or a poem in this form) of five 3-lined stanzas and a final quatrain, with only two rhymes throughout, usually of pastoral or lyric nature, 1580s, from French villanelle, from Italian villanella "ballad, rural song," from fem. of villanello "rustic," from Medieval Latin villanus "farmhand" (see villain).
Related entries & more 

Page 3