Etymology
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Ice-Capade (n.)
1941, originally a film title, from ice (n.) + a punning play on escapade.
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screenwriter (n.)

"writer of film scripts," 1921, from screen (n.) in the cinema sense + writer.

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pyrogen (n.)

1858, as a proposed word for "electricity considered as a material substance possessing weight," from pyro- + -gen. Meaning "fever-producer, substance which, introduced into the blood, induces fever" is from 1896. Related: Pyrogenic. Greek pyrogenes meant "born in fire, wrought by fire" (compare pyrogenesis).

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Bollywood 
"film industry based in Mumbai, India," 1977, from Bombay (old name of Mumbai) + Hollywood.
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Saran 
U.S. trademark name for PVC used as a cling-film, 1940, by Dow Chemical Company.
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glycogen (n.)
starch-like substance found in the liver and animal tissue, 1860, from French glycogène, "sugar-producer," from Greek-derived glyco- "sweet" (see glyco-) + French -gène (see -gen). Coined in 1848 by French physiologist Claude Bernard (1813-1878).
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undeveloped (adj.)
1736, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of develop (v.). In reference to film, it is attested from 1939.
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preview (n.)

"a foretaste," 1880, from preview (v.); specifically "a showing of a book, film, etc. before public release" by 1920.

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off-camera (adv.)

"outside the range of a film or television camera," 1944, from off (prep.) + camera.

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featurette (n.)
"short feature film," 1942, from feature (n.) in the cinematography sense + -ette.
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