Etymology
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expletive (n.)

1610s, "a word or phrase serving to fill out a sentence or metrical line," from French explétif (15c.) and directly from Late Latin expletivus "serving to fill out," from explet- past-participle stem of Latin explere "fill out, fill up, glut," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").

Sense of "an exclamation," especially "a curse word, an oath," first recorded 1815 in Sir Walter Scott, popularized by edited transcripts of Watergate tapes (mid-1970s), in which expletive deleted replaced President Nixon's salty expressions. As an adjective, from 1660s.

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implement (n.)
mid-15c., "supplementary payment, amount needed to complete repayment," from Late Latin implementem "a filling up" (as with provisions), from Latin implere "to fill, fill up, make full; fatten; fulfill, satisfy," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). Sense of "workman's tool, utensil of a trade, things necessary to do work" is 1530s. The underlying connection of the senses is "whatever may supply a want, that which fills up a need." Related: Implemental; implements.
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complement (n.)

late 14c., "means of completing; that which completes; what is needed to complete or fill up," from Old French compliement "accomplishment, fulfillment" (14c., Modern French complément), from Latin complementum "that which fills up or completes," from complere "fill up," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").

From c. 1600 as "full quality or number, full amount;" musical sense of "simple interval that completes an octave from another simple interval" is from 1873. In 16c. also having senses which were taken up c. 1650-1725 by compliment.

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accomplish (v.)
late 14c., "fulfill, perform, carry out an undertaking," from Old French acompliss-, present participle stem of acomplir "to fulfill, fill up, complete" (12c., Modern French accomplir), from Vulgar Latin *accomplere, from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + complere "to fill up," transferred to "fulfill, finish (a task)," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). Related: Accomplished; accomplishing.
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satiate (v.)

mid-15c., saciaten, "fill to repletion, satisfy, feed or nourish to the full," from Latin satiatus, past participle of satiare "fill full, satisfy," from satis "enough" (from PIE root *sa- "to satisfy"). By 1620s in a bad sense, "to fill beyond or over natural desire, weary by repletion." Related: Satiated; satiating.

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complete (adj.)

late 14c., "having no deficiency, wanting no part or element; perfect in kind or quality; finished, ended, concluded," from Old French complet "full," or directly from Latin completus, past participle of complere "to fill up, complete the number of (a legion, etc.)," transferred to "fulfill, finish (a task)," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").

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deplete (v.)

"empty, reduce, or exhaust by drawing away," 1807, originally in medicine (of blood-letting, purgatives), back-formation from depletion, which is from Latin deplere "to empty," literally "to un-fill," from de "off, away" (see de-) + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill"). General sense by 1859. Related: Depleted; depleting.

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pocketful (n.)

"as much as will fill a pocket," 1610s, from pocket (n.) + -ful.

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gefilte fish (n.)
1892, gefüllte Fisch, not a species but a loaf made from various kinds of ground fish and other ingredients; the first word is Yiddish, from German gefüllte "stuffed," from füllen "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").
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clafoutis (n.)

"batter pudding made with black cherries," 1948, from French, from dialectal verb clafir "to fill." The dish is a specialty of the Limousin region.

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