Etymology
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Capella 
bright northern star (fifth brightest in the heavens), the alpha of the constellation Auriga, by 17c., from Latin capella, literally "little she-goat" (Greek kinesai kheimonas), diminutive of capra "she-goat," fem. of caper "goat" (see cab).
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colonnade (n.)

in architecture, "a series of columns placed at certain intervals," 1718, from French colonnade, from Italian colonnato, from colonna "column," from Latin columna "pillar," collateral form of columen "top, summit," from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill." Also see -ade. Related: Colonnaded.

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non-viable (adj.)

applied to a fetus too young to maintain independent life, by 1821, from French non-viable (by 1813 in the Code Napoléon); see non- + viable.

It is an established fact, that under the fifth month no foetus can be born alive—from the fifth to the seventh it may come into the world alive, but cannot maintain existence. The French term these non viable. We may designate them non-rearable, or more properly immature—in distinction to those between the seventh and the ninth month, which may be reared, and are termed premature. [John Gordon Smith, M.D., "The Principles of Forensic Medicine," London, 1821] 
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vertex (n.)
1560s, "the point opposite the base in geometry," from Latin vertex "highest point," literally "the turning point," originally "whirling column, whirlpool," from vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Meaning "highest point of anything" is first attested 1640s.
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striate (v.)

1670s, from special modern use of Latin striatus, past participle of striare "to groove, to flute," from Latin stria "furrow, channel, flute of a column" (in Modern Latin "strip, streak"), possibly from PIE root *strig- "to stroke, rub, press" (see strigil). Related: Striated (1640s); striating.

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Miranda (2)

in reference to criminal suspects' arrest rights in U.S., 1967, from the name of rape and robbery suspect Ernesto Miranda (1941-1976) and his Fifth Amendment cases, ruled on by U.S. Supreme Court June 13, 1966, under the heading Ernesto A. Miranda v. the State of Arizona.

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July 

seventh month, c. 1050, Iulius, from Anglo-French julie, Old French Juil, Jule (Modern French uses a diminutive, Juillet) and directly from Latin Iulius "fifth month of the Roman calendar" (which began its year in March), renamed after his death and deification in honor of Gaius Julius Caesar, who was born in this month. In republican Rome it had been Quintilis, literally "fifth." Compare August. Accented on the first syllable in English until 18c.; "the modern Eng. pronunciation is abnormal and unexplained" [OED]. Replaced Old English liða se æfterra "later mildness," from liðe "mild."

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Trafalgar 
cape in southwestern Spain, from Arabic taraf-al-garb "end of the west," or taraf-agarr "end of the column" (in reference to the pillars of Hercules). The British naval victory over the French there was fought Oct. 21, 1805; hence London's Trafalgar Square, named in commemoration of it.
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quintuple (adj.)

"fivefold, containing five times the number or amount," 1560s, from French quintuple (15c.), from Late Latin quintuplex, from Latin quintus "fifth" (related to quinque "five;" from PIE root *penkwe- "five") on model of quadruple. Alternative quintuplicate is attested from 1670s. Musical quintuple time has five beats to the measure.

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Attic (adj.)
1590s, "pertaining to Attica" (q.v.), the region around Athens, from Latin Atticus "Athenian," from Greek Attikos "Athenian, of Attica." The Attic dialect came to be regarded as the literary standard of ancient Greece, and it passed into the koine of the Alexandrine and Roman periods. Attested from 1560s as an architectural term for a type of column base.
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