Etymology
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Pole (n.)

"inhabitant or native of Poland," 1650s, from German Pole, singular of Polen, from Polish Polanie "Poles," literally "field-dwellers," from pole "field," related to Old Church Slavonic polje "field" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread"). The older word was Polack.

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afield (adv.)

"in or to a field," 1590s, a contraction of Middle English prepositional phrase in felde, from Old English on felda "in the field" (especially of battle); see a- (1) + field (n.). Meaning "away from home, at a distance" is attested by early 15c.

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agriology (n.)

study of prehistoric human customs, 1878, from agrio-, from Greek agrios "wild," literally "living in the fields," from agros "field" (from PIE root *agro- "field") + -logy. Related: Agriologist (n., 1875); agriological.

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fielder (n.)

early 14c., "one who works in a field," agent noun from field (n.). Sporting sense is from 1832 (in cricket; by 1868 in baseball). Earlier in cricket was simply field (1825) and fieldsman (1767).

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agro- 

word-forming element meaning "pertaining to agriculture or cultivation," from Greek agros "field," from PIE root *agro- "field."

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battlefield (n.)

also battle-field, "scene of a battle," 1812, from battle (n.) + field (n.). The usual word for it in Old English was wælstow, literally "slaughter-place."

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honorific (adj.)

"conferring honor," 1640s, from French honorifique (16c.) or directly from Latin honorificus "that which does honor," from honorem (see honor (n.)) + -ficus "making, doing," from combining form of facere "make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). As a noun, "a word used as an honorific term," by 1867.

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reverence (v.)

late 14c., reverencen, "treat (someone) with respect, honor; venerate, pay pious homage to; esteem, value; bow to (someone); do honor to," from reverence (n.). Related: Reverenced; reverencing.

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Akita 

type of dog, named for a prefecture in northern Japan. The place name is said to mean literally "field of ripe rice," from aki "autumn, fall" + ta "field of rice."

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timocracy (n.)

1580s, from French tymocracie, from Medieval Latin timocratia (13c.), from Greek timokratia, from time "honor, worth" (related to tiein "to place a value on, to honor," from PIE *kwi-ma-, suffixed form of root *kweie- (1) "to value, honor") + -kratia "rule" (see -cracy). In Plato's philosophy, a form of government in which ambition for honor and glory motivates the rulers (as in Sparta). In Aristotle, a form of government in which political power is in direct proportion to property ownership. Related: Timocratic; timocratical.

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