Etymology
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heortology (n.)
"study of religious feasts and calendars," 1881, from Greek heorte "a feast or festival, holiday," + -ology. The immediate source of the English word is in French or German. Related: Heortological (1880).
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banquet (n.)

late 15c., "feast, sumptuous entertainment," from Old French banquet "feast," earlier simply "small bench," from Old Italian banchetto, diminutive of banco "bench," variant of banca "bench," which is from a Germanic source (see bench (n.)). Apparently, etymologically, "a snack eaten on a bench" (rather than at table), hence "a slight repast between meals;" if so, the meaning has drifted.

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potlatch (n.)

1845, among some American native peoples, "a gift," from Chinook jargon pot-latch, "a gift," from Nootka (Wakashan) patshatl "giving, gift." Later (1865) in sense "An Indian feast, often lasting several days, given to the tribe by a member who aspires to the position of chief, and whose reputation is estimated by the number and value of the gifts distributed at the feast" [Century Dictionary, 1895]

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Candlemas (n.)
Church festival, late Old English candelmæsse (from candle + mass (n.2)), feast of the purification of the Virgin Mary (Feb. 2), celebrated with many candles, corresponding to Celtic pagan Imbolc.
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convival (adj.)

1640s, from Latin convivalis "pertaining to a feast or guest," from conviva "a feaster, guest," from convivere (see convivial). It has been replaced in most uses by convivial, which means the same.

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dining (n.)

c. 1400, "feasting, a feast," verbal noun from dine (v.). Dining-room "room in which principal meals are eaten" is attested from c. 1600. The railroad dining-car is from 1838.

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invite (v.)

"solicit to come," 1530s, a back-formation from invitation, or else from French inviter (15c.), from Latin invitare "to invite," also "to summon, challenge; to feast, to entertain," a word of uncertain origin. Related: Invited; inviting.

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bridal (adj.)

"belonging to a bride or a wedding," c. 1200, transferred use of noun bridal "wedding feast," Old English brydealo "marriage feast," from bryd ealu, literally "bride ale" (see bride + ale); the second element later was confused with suffix -al (1), especially after c. 1600. Compare scot-ale under scot (n.) and Middle English scythe-ale (mid-13c.) "drinking celebration for mowers, as compensation for a particular job." Bridal-suite is by 1857.

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Tet (n.)
Vietnamese lunar new year, 1885, short for Tet Nguyen Dan "feast of the first day." The North Vietnamese Tet Offensive in the U.S. Vietnam War began Jan. 30, 1968.
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Michaelmas (n.)

early 12c., Sanct Micheles mæsse, the feast of the dedication of St. Michael the Archangel (Sept. 29), from Michael + mass (n.2). It was an English quarter day in the old business and university calendars. Goose is the day's traditional fare at least since 15c.

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