Etymology
Advertisement
hemophobia (n.)
1844, from hemo- "blood" + -phobia "fear." Perhaps based on French hémophobie. Originally in reference to fear of medical blood-letting.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
triskaidekaphobia (n.)
"fear of the number 13," 1908, also triskaidecaphobia, from Greek treiskaideka, triskaideka "thirteen" (from treis "three" + deka "ten") + -phobia "fear."
Related entries & more 
eek 
sound of a squeak of fear, by 1940.
Related entries & more 
Deimos 

satellite of Mars, discovered in 1877, named for Greek deimos, literally "fear, terror," also, as Deimos, the personification of such, regarded as a son of Ares, twin brother of Phobos"fear, panic, flight" (for which see phobia). Greek deimos is from PIE *duei- "fear," source also of Sanskrit dvesti "hate," Avestan duuaetha "threat," and possibly Latin dirus "fearful."

Related entries & more 
deter (v.)

1570s, "discourage and stop by fear," from Latin deterrere "to frighten from, discourage from," from de "away" (see de-) + terrere "frighten, fill with fear" (see terrible). Meaning "stop or prevent from acting or proceeding by any countervailing motive" is from 1590s. Related: Deterred; deterring.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
neophobia (n.)

"fear of novelty, abhorrence of what is new or unaccustomed," 1877; see neo- "new" + -phobia "fear." German neophobie is attested as a dictionary word from 1870; Docteur Neophobus was an alias of French author Charles Nodier (1780-1844). Related: Neophobe; neophobic.

Related entries & more 
terror (n.)
early 15c., "something that intimidates, an object of fear," from Old French terreur (14c.), from Latin terrorem (nominative terror) "great fear, dread, alarm, panic; object of fear, cause of alarm; terrible news," from terrere "fill with fear, frighten," from PIE root *tres- "to tremble" (see terrible).

From c. 1500 as "fear so great as to overwhelm the mind." Meaning "quality of causing dread" is attested from 1520s. Sense of "a person fancied as a source of terror" (often with deliberate exaggeration, as of a naughty child) is recorded from 1883. Terror bombing first recorded 1941, with reference to German air attack on Rotterdam. Terror-stricken is from 1831. The Reign of Terror in French history (March 1793-July 1794) was the period when the nation was ruled by a faction whose leaders made policy of killing by execution anyone deemed an impediment to their measures; so called in English from 1801. Old English words for "terror" included broga and egesa.
Related entries & more 
philophobia (n.)

"fear of love or emotional intimacy," by 1976, from philo- + -phobia.

Related entries & more 
anthropophobia (n.)
"fear of man," 1841 (from 1798 in German); see anthropo- + -phobia.
Related entries & more 
fright (v.)

"to frighten," Middle English, from Old English fyrhtan "to terrify, fill with fear," from the source of fright (n.). Old English had also forhtian "be afraid, become full of fear, tremble," but the primary sense of the verb in Middle English was "to make afraid."

Related entries & more 

Page 3