Etymology
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Ashura (n.)
Islamic voluntary fast on the 10th day of Muharram, Arabic Ashura', literally "tenth," from 'ashara "ten."
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hesitancy (n.)
1610s, from Latin haesitantia "action of stammering," from haesitantem (nominative haesitans) "stammering," present participle of haesitare "to stick fast, stammer" (see hesitation).
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motorway (n.)

"specialized highway for fast motor traffic," 1903, from motor- + way (n.). Earliest uses were hypothetical; the thing became a reality 1930s.

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hesitate (v.)
1620s, from Latin haesitatus, past participle of haesitare "to stick fast; to hesitate; to stammer" (see hesitation). Related: Hesitated; hesitating; hesitatingly.
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Jehu 
"fast, skillful driver," 1680s, from Jehu, a king of Israel in the Old Testament, who "driveth furiously" (II Kings ix.20). Sometimes also a generic name for "a coachman."
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yacht (n.)
1550s, yeaghe "a light, fast-sailing ship," from Norwegian jaght or early Dutch jaght, both from Middle Low German jacht, shortened form of jachtschip "fast pirate ship," literally "ship for chasing," from jacht "chase," from jagen "to chase, hunt," from Old High German jagon, from Proto-Germanic *yago-, from PIE root *yek- (2) "to hunt" (source also of Hittite ekt- "hunting net"). Related: Yachting; yachtsman.
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hotshot (n.)
"important person," 1933; see hot + shot (n.). It earlier meant "fast train" (1925), and "foolish, reckless person" (c. 1600).
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deligation (n.)

in surgery, "a binding up," 1660s, noun of action from stem of Latin deligare "to bind fast," from de- (see de-) + ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind").

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tachy- 
word-forming element meaning "rapid, swift, fast," from Latinized combining form of Greek takhys "swift, rapid, hasty," related to takhos "speed, swiftness," of uncertain origin.
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speeding (n.)
c. 1300, "success;" c. 1400 "action of aiding;" verbal noun from speed (v.). Meaning "action of driving an automobile too fast" is from 1908. Speeding ticket is from 1940.
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