Etymology
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Kickapoo 

Native American people of the Algonquian family, 1722, from native /kiikaapoa/ which is sometimes interpreted as "wanderers" [Bright].

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household (n.)

late 14c., "members of a family collectively (including servants)," also "furniture and articles belonging to a house;" see house (n.) + hold (n.1). As an adjective, "of or pertaining to house and family, domestic," from late 14c. Compare householder. Household word, one that is in very familiar use, is from 1590s; variant household name is from 1862.

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husbandman (n.)

c. 1300, "head of a family;" early 14c. as "farmer, tiller of the soil," from husband (n.) + man (n.).

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san 

Japanese honorific title suffixed to personal or family names, 1878, short form of more formal sama.

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Reading 

county town of Berkshire, Old English Readingum (c. 900), "(Settlement of) the family or followers of a man called *Read."

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Buckinghamshire 

Old English Buccingahamscir, from Buccingahamme (early 10c.), "River-bend land of the family or followers of a man called Bucca."

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Stuart 

name of the British royal family from 1603 to 1668; see steward. Attested from 1873 as an attribution for styles from that period.

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hafla (n.)

in reference to belly-dance performance and social gathering, by 1998, from Arabic hafla "party, social or family gathering."

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Germanic (adj.)

1630s, "of Germany or Germans," from Latin Germanicus, from Germani (see German (n.)). From 1773 as "of the Teutonic race;" from 1842 especially with reference to the language family that includes German, Dutch, English, etc. As a noun, the name of that language family, by 1892, replacing earlier Teutonic. Germanical is attested from 1550s.

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Battenberg (n.)

type of cake, 1903, from name of a town in Germany, the seat of a family which became known in Britain as Mountbatten.

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