Etymology
Advertisement
lapsed (adj.)
of persons, "fallen away from the faith," 1630s, past-participle adjective from lapse (v.). Originally especially to those who denied Christianity during prosecution.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
backslide (v.)
in the religious sense "abandon faith or devotions, apostatize," 1580s, from back (adv.) + slide (v.). Related: Backslider; backsliding (1550s).
Related entries & more 
catholicity (n.)

1790, "Catholicism, faith or doctrines of the Catholic church," from Catholic + -ity. Meaning "quality of being inclusive or comprehensive" is by 1812.

Related entries & more 
traditional (adj.)

1590s, "observing traditions;" c. 1600, "handed down as tradition," from tradition + -al (1). In reference to jazz, from 1950. Related: Traditionally; traditionalist.

There is no hope in returning to a traditional faith after it has once been abandoned, since the essential condition in the holder of a traditional faith is that he should not know he is a traditionalist. [Al Ghazali]
Related entries & more 
universalism (n.)
1805 in theology, "the doctrine of universal salvation," from universal (adj.) + -ism. Universalist "one who, professing the Christian faith, believes in the eventual redemption of all humanity" is attested from 1620s.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Fay 
fem. proper name, in some cases from Middle English fei, Old French fei "faith," or else from fay "fairy."
Related entries & more 
auto-da-fe (n.)
"sentence passed by the Inquisition" (plural autos-da-fé), 1723, from Portuguese auto-da-fé "judicial sentence, act of the faith," especially the public burning of a heretic, from Latin actus de fide. The elements are auto "a play," in law, "an order, decree, sentence," from Latin actus (see act (v.)), de "from, of" (see de), fides "faith" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). The Spanish form is auto-de-fe, but the Portuguese form took hold in English, perhaps through popular accounts of the executions following the earthquake of 1755.
Related entries & more 
martyrdom (n.)

"torture and execution for the sake of one's faith," Old English martyrdom; see martyr (n.) + -dom. As "a state of suffering for the maintaining of any obnoxious cause," late 14c.

Related entries & more 
affiance (v.)
1520s, "to promise," from Old French afiancier "to pledge, promise, give one's word," from afiance (n.) "confidence, trust," from afier "to trust," from Late Latin affidare, from ad "to" (see ad-) + fidare "to trust," from fidus "faithful," from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade."

From mid-16c. especially "to promise in marriage." The earlier form of the word was affy (Middle English affien "to trust, have faith; have faith in" c. 1300), from Old French afier. Related: Affianced; affiancing.
Related entries & more 
Berean 
from Greek Beroia, name of a town in Macedonia. The name was taken up by Scottish dissenters in reference to Acts xvii.11 where the Christians of that town based faith on Scripture rather than human authority.
Related entries & more 

Page 3