Etymology
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fairway (n.)
1580s, "navigational channel of a river," from fair (adj.) + way (n.). Golfing sense is by 1898.
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stallage (n.)
"tax levied for the privilege of erecting a stall at a market or fair," late 14c. (mid-13c. in Anglo-Latin), from stall (n.1) + -age.
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Serena 
fem. proper name, from Latin serena, fem. of serenus "clear, bright, fair, joyous" (see serene).
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blond (n.)
c. 1755 of a type of lace (originally unbleached silk, hence the name); 1822 of persons with blond hair and fair complexions; from blond (adj.).
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coochie (n.)
"vagina," slang, by 1991, perhaps from hoochie-coochie, especially in the blues song "Hoochie Coochie Man" by Willie Dixon (1954), featuring a sexually suggestive phrase that traces at least to the 1893 World's Fair (see hoochy koochy).
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fairness (n.)
Old English fægernes "beauty;" see fair (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "even-handedness, impartiality" is from mid-15c. Meaning "lightness of complexion" is from 1590s.
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gaff (n.3)
"cheap music hall or theater; place of amusement for the lowest classes," 1812, British slang, earlier "a fair" (1753), of unknown origin.
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Jennifer 
fem. proper name, from Welsh Gwenhwyvar, from gwen "fair, white" + (g)wyf "smooth, yielding." The most popular name for girls born in America 1970-1984; all but unknown there before 1938. Also attested as a surname from late 13c.
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smicker (adj.)
"elegant, fine, gay," from Old English smicere "neat, elegant, beautiful, fair, tasteful." Hence smicker (v.) "look amorously" (1660s); smickering "an amorous inclination" (1690s).
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Branwen 
fem. proper name, from Welsh bran "raven" + (g)wen "fair" (literally "visible," from nasalized form of PIE root *weid- "to see"). Daughter of Llyr, she was a legendary heroine of Wales.
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