Etymology
Advertisement
antiphrasis (n.)
in rhetoric, "the use of a word in a sense opposite to its proper meaning; ironic use of a word in sarcasm or humor," 1530s, from Latin antiphrasis, from Greek antiphrasis, from antiphrazein "to express (something) by the opposite," from anti "against, opposite, instead of" (see anti-) + phrazein "to tell, declare, point out, express" (see phrase (n.)). Related: Antiphrastic.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
restate (v.)

also re-state, "express over again or in a new way," 1713, from re- "again" + state (v.). Related: Restated; restating.

Related entries & more 
operationalize (v.)

1954, in psychology, "express in operational terms," from operational + -ize. Related: Operationalized; operationalizing; operationalization (1966).

Related entries & more 
parenthesize (v.)

"insert as a parenthesis, express or state in parentheses," 1825, from parenthesis + -ize. Related: Parenthesized; parenthesizing.

Related entries & more 
enunciative (adj.)
"declarative, declaring something as true," 1530s, from Latin enunciatus, properly enuntiativus, from past participle stem of enuntiare "to speak out, say, express" (see enunciate).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
query (v.)

"to question, ask questions; express doubt," 1650s, from query (n.). Intransitive sense is by 1680s. Related: Queried; querying.

Related entries & more 
enunciate (v.)
1620s, "declare, express," from Latin enunciatus, properly enuntiatus, past participle of enuntiare "speak out, say, express, assert; divulge, disclose, reveal, betray," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + nuntiare "to announce," from nuntius "messenger" (from PIE root *neu- "to shout"). Or perhaps a back-formation from enunciation. Meaning "to articulate, pronounce" is from 1759. Related: Enunciated; enunciating.
Related entries & more 
rephrase (v.)

also re-phrase, "express in another way, change or adjust the wording of," 1872, from re- "again" + phrase (v.). Related: Rephrased; rephrasing.

Related entries & more 
paraphrase (v.)

"restate, interpret, express the meaning of in other words," c. 1600, from paraphrase (n.) or from French paraphraser. Related: Paraphrased; paraphrasing.

Related entries & more 
approbate (v.)
"express a liking or satisfaction," late 15c., from Latin approbatus, past participle of approbare "to assent to (as good), favor" (see approve). Related: Approbated; approbating.
Related entries & more 

Page 3