Etymology
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prostitution (n.)

1530s, "act or practice of offering the body to indiscrimninate sexual intercourse for hire," from French prostitution and directly from Late Latin prostitutionem (nominative prostitutio) "prostitution," noun of action from past-participle stem of prostituere "to expose publicly to prostitution" (see prostitute (v.)). Figuratively (of abilities, etc.), "act of devoting or offering to a base or infamous use," by 1640s.

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satirize (v.)

c. 1600, "to write satires," an intransitive sense, now obsolete, from French satiriser, from the noun in French (see satire (n.)). The transitive sense of "assail with satire, expose (someone or something) to censure or ridicule with satiric wit" is by 1630s. As Related: Satirized; satirizing.

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disclose (v.)

late 14c., disclosen, "to uncover and expose to view, open to the knowledge of others," from Old French desclos "open, exposed, plain, explicit," past participle of desclore (Modern French déclore) "open, break open, unlock, reveal," from des- "opposite of" (see dis-) + clore "to close" (see close (v.)). Related: Disclosed; disclosing.

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braze (v.1)
1580s, "to expose to the action of fire" perhaps (but the sense evolution is odd) from French braser "to solder," in Old French, "to burn," related to brese "embers," ultimately from West Germanic *brasa, from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn." Related: Brazed; brazing. Sense of "to solder" is attested in English from 1670s.
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compromise (v.)
Origin and meaning of compromise

mid-15c., "to adjust or settle by mutual concessions," also intransitive, "to make a compromise," from compromise (n.). Meaning "expose to risk or hazard, endanger the reputation of" is from 1690s. Also formerly in the same sense was compromit (early 15c.), from Latin compromittere. Related: Compromised; compromising.

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moon (v.)

c. 1600, "to expose to moonlight;" later "idle about, wander or gaze moodily" (1836), "move listlessly" (1848), probably on the notion also found in moonstruck. The meaning "to flash the buttocks" is recorded by 1968, U.S. student slang, from moon (n.) "buttocks" (1756), "probably from the idea of pale circularity" [Ayto]. See moon (n.). Related: Mooned; mooning.

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subject (v.)
late 14c., "to make (a person or nation) subject to another by force," also "to render submissive or dependent," from Medieval Latin subiectare "place beneath," frequentative of Latin subicere "to make subject, subordinate" (see subject (n.)). Meaning "to lay open or expose to (some force or occurrence)" is recorded from early 15c. (implied in subjected). Related: Subjecting.
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irradiate (v.)
c. 1600, "to cast beams of light upon," from Latin irradiatus, past participle of irradiare "shine forth, beam upon, illumine," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + radiare "to shine" (see radiate (v.)). Meaning "expose to radiation other than light" (originally X-rays) is from 1901. Related: Irradiated; irradiating.
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detector (n.)

1540s, "one who detects," from Latin detector "uncoverer, revealer," agent noun from detectus, past participle of detegere "to uncover, expose," figuratively "discover, reveal, disclose" (see detect). From 1833 as "instrument or device for indicating the presence or state of a thing," originally an arrangement in a lock supposed to indicate attempts to tamper with it.

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shop (v.)

1680s, "to bring something to a shop, to expose for sale," from shop (n.). The meaning "to visit shops for the purpose of examining or purchasing goods" is first attested 1764. Related: Shopped; shopping. Shop around "seek alternatives before choosing" is from 1922. Shopping cart is recorded from 1956; shopping list is attested by 1913; transferred and figurative use is from 1959.

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