Etymology
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delirious (adj.)

1703, "wandering in the mind, affected with delirium" (as a result of fever or illness), from stem of delirium + -ous. The earlier adjective was delirous (1650s). Figurative sense of "characterized by or proceeding from wild excitement or exaggerated emotion" is by 1791. Related: Deliriously; deliriousness.

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irritation (n.)

early 15c., irritacioun, in physiology, in reference to sores and morbid swelling, from Old French irritacion or directly from Latin irritationem (nominative irritatio) "incitement, stimulus; irritation, wrath, anger," noun of action from past-participle stem of irritare "to excite, provoke" (see irritate). Meaning "impatient or angry excitement" is from 1703.

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overwork (v.)

"to cause to work too hard," 1520s, from over- + work (v.). The figurative sense of "to work into a state of excitement and confusion" is by 1640s. Old English oferwyrcan meant "to work all over," i.e. "to decorate the whole surface of." Related: Overworked; overworking.

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flutter (v.)
Old English floterian "to flutter (of birds), to fly before, flicker, float to and fro, be tossed by waves," frequentative of flotian "to float" (see float (v.)). Meaning "throw (someone) into confusion" is from 1660s. Related: Fluttered; fluttering. As a noun, "quick, irregular motion," from 1640s; meaning "state of excitement" is 1740s. Flutterpate "flighty person" is from 1894.
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breathless (adj.)
late 14c., "unable to breathe," from breath + -less. Meaning "out of breath, panting" is from mid-15c. Also used from 1590s in the sense "dead." Meaning "forgetting to breathe" due to excitement, awe, anticipation, etc. is recorded from 1765. Related: Breathlessly; breathlessness. Breathful was used late 16c.
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hysteria (n.)
nervous disease, 1801, coined in medical Latin as an abstract noun from Greek hystera "womb," from PIE *udtero-, variant of *udero- "abdomen, womb, stomach" (see uterus). Originally defined as a neurotic condition peculiar to women and thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the uterus. With abstract noun ending -ia. General sense of "unhealthy emotion or excitement" is by 1839.
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cold-blooded (adj.)

also coldblooded; 1590s, of persons, "without emotion, wanting usual sympathies, unfeeling;" of actions, from 1828. The phrase refers to the notion in old medicine that blood temperature rose with excitement. In the literal sense, of reptiles, etc., "having blood very little different in temperature from the surrounding environment," from c. 1600. From cold (adj.) + blood (n.). Related: Cold-bloodedly; cold-bloodedness.

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rave (n.)

1590s, "frenzy, great excitement," from rave (v.). Meaning "temporary popular enthusiasm" is from 1902; that of "highly flattering review" is by 1926 (when it was noted as a Variety magazine word). By 1960 as "rowdy party;" rave-up was British slang for "wild party" from 1940; the specific sense of "mass party with loud, fast electronic music and often psychedelic drugs" is by 1989.

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faze (v.)
1830, American English, said to be a variant of Kentish dialect feeze "to frighten, alarm, discomfit" (mid-15c.), from Old English fesian, fysian "drive away, send forth, put to flight," from Proto-Germanic *fausjan (source also of Swedish fösa "drive away," Norwegian föysa). Related: Fazed; fazing. Bartlett (1848) has it as to be in a feeze "in a state of excitement." There also is a nautical verb feaze "to unravel" (a rope), from 1560s.
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somnambulism (n.)
1786, "walking in one's sleep or under hypnosis," from French somnambulisme, from Modern Latin somnambulus "sleepwalker," from Latin somnus "sleep" (from PIE root *swep- "to sleep") + ambulare "to walk" (see amble (v.)).

Originally brought into use during the excitement over "animal magnetism;" it won out over noctambulation. A stack of related words came into use early 19c., such as somnambule "sleepwalker" (1837, from French somnambule, 1690s), earlier somnambulator (1803); as adjectives, somnambulary (1827), somnambular (1820).
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