Etymology
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overindulgence (n.)

also over-indulgence, "excessive indulgence," 1630s, from over- + indulgence. First attested in Donne (over-indulgency). Related: Overindulgent.

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overmuch (adj.)

"too great in amount, excessive, immoderate," c. 1300, from over- + much (q.v.). As an adverb, "excessively, immoderately," from late 14c. As a noun, "an excessive amount," c. 1300. Old English had cognate ofermicel. Middle English had also overmore "further, in addition, moreover" (late 14c.). 

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diuresis (n.)

"excessive secretion of urine," 1680s, medical Latin, from Greek diourein "to urinate," from dia "through" (see dia-) + ourein "urinate," from ouron (see urine) + -esis.

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immodesty (n.)
1590s, "lewdness, indecency;" c. 1600, "arrogance," from Latin immodestia "intemperate conduct," from immodestus "unrestrained, excessive" (see immodest).
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horse-play (n.)
also horseplay, "rough, excessive play," 1580s, from horse (n.) with its associations of "strong, coarse" + play (n.).
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overreact (v.)

also over-react, "respond with excessive force or emotion," by 1928, from over- + react (v.). Related: Overreacted; overreacting; overreaction.

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overuse (v.)

also over-use, "use too much or too frequently; injure by excessive use," 1670s, from over- + use (v.). Related: Overused; overusing.

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Anglomania (n.)
"excessive or undue enthusiasm for England and all things English," 1787 (Jefferson); see Anglo- + mania. Related: Anglomaniac.
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overeat (v.)

"to eat too much," 1590s, from over- + eat (v.). Related: Overate; overeating. Old English had oferæt (n.) "gluttony;" oferæte (adj.) "gluttonous, excessive eating."

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immoderate (adj.)
"excessive, extreme, lacking moderation," late 14c., from Latin immoderatus "boundless, immeasurable," figuratively "unrestrained, excessive," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + moderatus "within bounds, observing moderation;" figuratively "modest, restrained," past participle of moderari "to regulate, mitigate, restrain, temper, set a measure, keep (something) within measure," from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Related: Immoderately.
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