Etymology
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toss-up (n.)
"even matter," 1809, from earlier sense of "a flipping of a coin to arrive at a decision" (c. 1700), from verbal phrase, from toss (v.) + up (adv.).
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pic (n.)

by 1884 as a colloquial shortening of picture (n.). Short for motion picture by 1936. Even more colloquial piccy is recorded from 1889.

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casuistry (n.)

1703, in ethics, "the solution of special problems of conscience by application of general principles or theories;" see casuist + -ry. Even in the earliest printed uses the sense was pejorative.

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fairness (n.)
Old English fægernes "beauty;" see fair (adj.) + -ness. Meaning "even-handedness, impartiality" is from mid-15c. Meaning "lightness of complexion" is from 1590s.
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highfalutin' (adj.)
also high-falutin, 1839, U.S. slang, possibly from high-flying or high-flown, or even fluting. As a noun from 1848.
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non-resistance (n.)

also nonresistance, "absence of resistance; passive obedience; submission to authority, even if unjustly exercised," 1640s, from non- + resistance. Related: Non-resistant; non-resisting.

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grubelsucht (n.)
1876, from German Grübelsucht, psychiatric term for "a form of obsession in which even the simplest facts are compulsively queried" [OED], from grübeln "to brood" (see grub (v.)) + sucht "mania."
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off-Broadway (adj.)

1953 in reference to experimental theater productions in New York City, from off (prep.) + Broadway. Even more experimental off-off-Broadway is attested by 1958.

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piano (adv.)

musical instruction, "softly, with little force or loudness," 1680s, from Italian piano, which is ultimately is from Latin planus "flat, smooth, even," later "soft" (from PIE root *pele- (2) "flat; to spread").

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humbug (n.)
1751, student slang, "trick, jest, hoax, imposition, deception," of unknown origin. Also appearing as a verb at the same time, "deceive by false pretext" (trans.). A vogue word of the early 1750s; its origin was a subject of much whimsical speculation even then. "[A]s with other and more recent words of similar introduction, the facts as to its origin appear to have been lost, even before the word became common enough to excite attention" [OED]. Meaning "spirit of deception or imposition; hollowness, sham" is from 1825.
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