Etymology
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Moldova 

country in Eastern Europe, named for the river through it, probably from a PIE word meaning "dark, darkish color, soiled, black" (see melano-).

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Eurasian (adj.)
1844, from Euro- + Asian. Originally of children of British-East Indian marriages; meaning "of Europe and Asia considered as one continent" is from 1868. As a noun from 1845.
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oriole (n.)

1776, "the golden oriole," a bird of Europe, so called from its rich yellow color, from French oriol, Old Provençal auriol, from Medieval Latin oryolus, oriolus (13c.), from Latin aureolus "golden," from PIE *aus- (2) "gold" (see aureate).

Originally in reference to Oriolus galbula, a bird of black and yellow plumage that summers in Europe (but is uncommon in England). The name was applied by 1791 to the unrelated but similarly colored North American species Icterus baltimore.

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poulaine 

"long-pointed toe of a shoe," mid-15c., from Old French Poulaine, literally "Poland," hence "in the Polish fashion." The style was supposed in Western Europe to have originated there. Compare Cracow.

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bullfinch (n.)
common oscine passerine bird of Europe, 1560s, from bull (n.1) + finch; supposedly so called for the shape of its head and neck or its bill; compare French bouvreuil.
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redeploy (v.)

"move (troops or resources) from one area of activity to another," 1945, in reference to U.S. soldiers shifting from Europe to Asia after the fall of Berlin, from re- "again, anew" + deploy. Related: Redeployed; redeploying.

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Carpathian 
1670s, in reference to the mountain range of Eastern Europe, from Thracian Greek Karpates oros, probably literally literally "Rocky Mountain;" related to Albanian karpe "rock." From 1630s in reference to the island of Carpathos in the Aegean.
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Bohunk (n.)

U.S. derogatory slang for "lower-class immigrant from Central or Eastern Europe," by 1899, probably from Bohemian (see Bohemia) + a distortion of Hungarian (see Hungary).

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sunflower (n.)
1560s, "heliotrope," from sun (n.) + flower (n.). In reference to the Helianthus (introduced to Europe 1510 from America by the Spaniards) it is attested from 1590s, so called from the appearance of the heads.
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Bessarabia 
old name for the region of Eastern Europe that now mostly is the nation of Moldova, probably from Besarab, a dynastic name of Wallachian princes, said to be from Turkish basar. Related: Bessarabian.
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