Etymology
Advertisement
prize (v.1)

1580s, "to estimate the value of; value highly," spelling alteration of Middle English prisen "to reckon the worth of, value, esteem, praise" (late 14c.), from stem of Old French preisier "to praise" (see praise (v.)). Related: Prized; prizing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
undervalue (v.)
1590s, "to rate as inferior in value" (to), from under + value (v.). Sense of "to estimate or esteem too low" is recorded from 1610s. Meaning "to rate at too low a monetary value" is attested from 1620s. Related: Undervalued; undervaluing.
Related entries & more 
prefer (v.)

late 14c., preferren, "to put forward or advance in rank or fortune, to promote (to an office, dignity, or position); further (one's interest)," from Old French preferer (14c.) and directly from Latin praeferre "place or set before, carry in front," from prae "before" (see pre-) + ferre "to carry, to bear," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children."

The meaning "to esteem or value (something) more than others, set before others in liking or esteem" also is recorded from late 14c. and is now the usual sense. The other sense in English is preserved in preferment.

Related entries & more 
postpone (v.)

"put off, defer to a future or later time," c. 1500, from Latin postponere "put after; esteem less; neglect; postpone," from post "after" (see post-) + ponere "put, place" (see position (n.)). Related: Postponed; postponing.

Related entries & more 
amour-propre (n.)

1775, French, "sensitive self-love, self-esteem;" see amour and proper.

Vanity usually gives the meaning as well, &, if as well, then better. [Fowler]

Middle English had it, translated, as proper love "self-love."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
postposition (n.)

"act of placing after," 1630s, noun of action from Latin postponere "put after; esteem less; postpone" from post "after" (see post-) + ponere "to put, place" (see position (n.)). Perhaps modeled on French postposition. Related: Postposit (v., 1660s); postpositive; postpositional.

Related entries & more 
nullify (v.)

"render legally null and void, render invalid," 1590s, from Late Latin nullificare "to esteem lightly, despise," literally "to make nothing," from Latin nullus "not any" (see null) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Nullified; nullifying; nullifier.

Related entries & more 
reputable (adj.)

1610s, "capable of being taken into account" (a sense now obsolete), from repute (n.) + -able. Meaning "consistent with good reputation, not mean or disgraceful" is by 1670s; of persons, "held in esteem, having a good reputation" by 1690s. Related: Reputably.

Related entries & more 
probate (v.)

1560s, "to prove" (a general sense now obsolete), from probate (n.) or from Latin probatus, past participle of probare "to make good; esteem, represent as good; make credible, show, demonstrate; test, inspect; judge by trial." Specific sense of "prove the genuineness of a will" is from 1792. Related: Probated; probating.

Related entries & more 
respects (n.)

"expressions or signs of esteem, deference, or compliment," 1610s; see respect (n.). Earlier (late 14c.) as "aspects, particular respects." For "expression of regard," Middle English had respeccioun (respection), from Latin. To pay (one's) respects "show polite attention by visiting or making a call" is by 1660s.

Related entries & more 

Page 3