Etymology
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cop out 

by 1942, noun ("a cowardly escape, an evasion") and verb ("sneak off, escape, give up without trying"), American English slang, perhaps from cop a plea (c. 1925) "plead guilty to lesser charges," which is probably from northern British slang cop "to catch" (a scolding, etc.); as in cop a feel "grope someone" (1930s); see cop (v.). Sense of "evade an issue or problem" is from 1960s.

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elusion (n.)

"deception, escape by artifice or deceit," 1540s, noun of action from elude, or from Medieval Latin elusionem (nominative elusio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin eludere.

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extravasation (n.)
"escape of fluid into the tissues after a rupture," 1670s, from Latin extra "outside" (see extra-) + form derived from vas "vessel" (see vas (n.)). Related: Extravasate (1660s).
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safekeeping (n.)

also safe-keeping, "act of preserving in safety or keeping from injury or escape," early 15c., from safe (adj.) + verbal noun from keep (v.). The verb safekeep is a back-formation (by 1966).

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evasion (n.)

early 15c., evasioun, "a way out, expedient," from Old French évasion and directly from Late Latin evasionem (nominative evasio) "a going out," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin evadere "to escape" (see evade).

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breakaway 
also break-away, 1906 (n.), in reference to sports; 1930s (adj.) in reference to splinter groups; from the verbal phrase (attested from 1530s in the sense "disengage oneself abruptly, escape"); see break (v.) + away (adv.).
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ironclad (adj.)
1852 of knights, 1861, of warships, American English, from iron (n.) + clad. Figuratively, of contracts, etc., "very rigid or strict, allowing no evasion or escape," from 1884. As a noun meaning "iron-clad ship," it is attested from 1862.
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Adrastea 
"nemesis," daughter of Zeus, distributor of rewards and punishments, from Greek Adrasteia, literally "she from whom there is no escape," from adrastos "not running away," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + stem of drasmos "a running away," related to dromos "course" (see dromedary).
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out (n.)

late 15c., "egress," from out (adj). From 1620s, "a being out" (of something), from out (adv.). From 1764 in politics as "the party which is out of office." From 1860 in the baseball sense "act of getting an opposing player out of active play." From 1919 as "means of escape; alibi."

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evasive (adj.)
1725 of persons; 1744 of actions, etc., from French évasif, from Latin evas-, past participle stem of evadere "to get away, escape" (see evasion). Related: Evasively; evasiveness. Evasive action is from 1940, originally in military aviation.
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