Etymology
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indeterminate (adj.)
late 14c., from Late Latin indeterminatus "undefined, unlimited," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + determinatus, past participle of determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to" (see determine). Related: Indeterminately.
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determinate (adj.)

late 14c., "having defined limits, definite, defined, specific," from Latin determinatus, past participle of determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to" (see determine). Also "fixed in mind" (mid-15c.).

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enshrine (v.)

in early use also inshrine, "enclose in or as in a shrine; deposit for safe-keeping," 1580s, from en- (1) "make, put in" + shrine (n.). Related: Enshrined; enshrining.

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inclusive (adv.)
"including the stated limits in the number or sum," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin inclusivus, from Latin inclus-, past participle stem of includere "to shut in, enclose" (see include).
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indeterminable (adj.)
late 15c., from Late Latin indeterminabilis "that cannot be defined," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + determinabilis "that can be defined," from determinare "to enclose, bound, set limits to" (see determine). Related: Indeterminably.
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picket (v.)

1745, "to enclose or fortify with pointed stakes," from picket (n.). Meaning "to place or post as a guard of observation" is by 1775. The sense in labor strikes, protests, etc., is attested from 1867. Related: Picketed; picketing.

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cortege (n.)
1640s, "train of attendants," from French cortège (16c.), from Italian corteggio "retinue," from corte "court," from Latin cohortem "enclosure," from com- "with" (see co-) + root akin to hortus "garden," from PIE *ghr-ti-, from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose."
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house (v.)
"give shelter to," Old English husian "to take into a house; place or enclose in a house" (cognate with Old Frisian husa, German hausen, Dutch huizen); see house (n.). Intransitive sense from 1590s. Related: Housed; housing.
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orbed (adj.)

"having the form of an orb, round circular," 1590s, an adjective in past-participle form from orb (n.). The verb orb is attested from 1640s as "enclose in an orb," 1650s as "make an orb," and 1850 in the intransitive sense of "to become an orb."

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garth (n.)
"small piece of enclosed ground," a northern and western English dialect word, mid-14c., from Old Norse garðr "yard, courtyard, fence," cognate of Old English geard "fenced enclosure," from PIE root *gher- (1) "to grasp, enclose."
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