Etymology
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semiconductor (n.)

1838, "material whose electrical conductivity is between that of a conductor and that of an insulator," from semi- + conductor. Modern very specific sense is recorded from 1931. Related: Semi-conducting (1782).

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off-peak (adj.)

"that is not at the maximum," 1906, originally in reference to electrical systems, from off- (adj.) (see off (prep.)) + peak (n.).

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self-starter (n.)

1894, "electrical device for starting an engine;" 1960, of persons (especially workers) who habitually act on their own initiative; see self- + starter. Self-starting (adj.), of motors, is attested from 1866.

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transformer (n.)

c. 1600, "one who or that which transforms," agent noun from transform (v.). Meaning "device to reduce electrical currents" is from 1882.

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impedance (n.)

"hindrance," especially and originally "resistance due to induction in an electrical circuit," 1886, from impede + -ance. The classically correct formation would be *impedience.

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voltaic (adj.)

1813, designating electricity produced by chemical action, formed in recognition of Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745-1827), who perfected a chemical process used in electrical batteries, + -ic.

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electro- 

before vowels electr-, word-forming element meaning "electrical, electricity," Latinized form of Greek ēlektro-, combining form of ēlektron "amber" (see electric). As a stand-alone, formerly often short for electrotype, electroplate.

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lead-in (n.)

1913, in electrical wiring, from verbal phrase; see lead (v.1) + in (adv.). General sense of "introduction, opening" is from 1928, originally in music.

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superpower (n.)

1944, in geopolitical sense of "nation with great interest and ability to exert force in worldwide theaters of conflict," from super- + power (n.). The word itself is attested in physical (electrical power) senses from 1922.

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raster (n.)

"scanning field," 1934 in electrical engineering, from German Raster "screen, frame," from Latin rastrum "rake," from rasum, from rodere "to scrape" (see rodent). Related: Rasterization; rasterize. From Latin form rastellum comes French râteau "rake," formerly ratel, originally rastel.

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